Undergraduate students’ attitudes toward mental illness: Pre and post psychiatric nursing education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160735
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Undergraduate students’ attitudes toward mental illness: Pre and post psychiatric nursing education
Abstract:
Undergraduate students’ attitudes toward mental illness: Pre and post psychiatric nursing education
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Rossen, Eileen
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA
Contact Telephone:765.494.9248
As future health care providers, nursing students hold many of the same myths, attitudes, misunderstandings and stereotypes towards mental illness as does the general population. The purpose of this study is to examine whether psychiatric nursing education using a therapeutic, psychodynamic, interpersonal process model (Peplau, 1952) was effective in favorably changing nursing students’ attitudes toward mental illness. Using pre-post design, 50 junior BSN nursing students completed the Opinions About Mental Illness Scale (OMI) prior to and at completion of their psychiatric nursing course. Paired T tests were used to examine the difference between pre-and post scores on the five factors of the scale (mental hygiene ideology, interpersonal etiology, authoritarianism, benevolence and social restriction). The findings in this study suggest that student opinions about mental illness can be favorably altered by psychiatric nursing education focusing on the interpersonal process model.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUndergraduate students’ attitudes toward mental illness: Pre and post psychiatric nursing educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160735-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Undergraduate students&rsquo; attitudes toward mental illness: Pre and post psychiatric nursing education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rossen, Eileen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">765.494.9248</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rossen@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As future health care providers, nursing students hold many of the same myths, attitudes, misunderstandings and stereotypes towards mental illness as does the general population. The purpose of this study is to examine whether psychiatric nursing education using a therapeutic, psychodynamic, interpersonal process model (Peplau, 1952) was effective in favorably changing nursing students&rsquo; attitudes toward mental illness. Using pre-post design, 50 junior BSN nursing students completed the Opinions About Mental Illness Scale (OMI) prior to and at completion of their psychiatric nursing course. Paired T tests were used to examine the difference between pre-and post scores on the five factors of the scale (mental hygiene ideology, interpersonal etiology, authoritarianism, benevolence and social restriction). The findings in this study suggest that student opinions about mental illness can be favorably altered by psychiatric nursing education focusing on the interpersonal process model.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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