Self-system and depression in Japanese women: Refining accepted models of mental health

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160738
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-system and depression in Japanese women: Refining accepted models of mental health
Abstract:
Self-system and depression in Japanese women: Refining accepted models of mental health
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:St. Arnault, Denise, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Contact Address:College of Nursing, A230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA
Contact Telephone:517.355.3332
Relationships between self-concept and depression have been examined in terms of the centrality and valence among self-descriptors, and the discrepancies between actual and possible selves. However, cross-cultural psychological research has questioned whether self-models that emphasize positivity and achievement can be generalized across cultures. This pilot research examines the validity of self-structural and self-discrepancy models of mental health in a sample of 15 Japanese women. It uses the Zajonc (1960) cardsort method to measure schemas and self-discrepancy. Depression was measured with a Japanese version of the CES-D. Consistent with American samples, preliminary findings (N=7) suggest that depression scores are related to number of schemas (r=-.937, p=. 002), and the number of positive schemas (r=-.920, p=. 003), suggesting that the overall centrality of selves and centrality of positive selves may promote mental health. Additionally, while ideal/actual self-discrepancy predicts depression in western sample, ought/actual self-discrepancy was related to depression in this Japanese sample (r=-.845, p=. 017). These findings suggest that while structural factors may predict mental health cross-culturally, the meaning of self-definitions and emotional responses to self-discrepancy are culturally defined, confirming that refinements in models of mental health are warranted. These models are central in the provision of theory-based mental heath promotion.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-system and depression in Japanese women: Refining accepted models of mental healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160738-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-system and depression in Japanese women: Refining accepted models of mental health</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">St. Arnault, Denise, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, A230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517.355.3332</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">denise.arnault@ht.msu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Relationships between self-concept and depression have been examined in terms of the centrality and valence among self-descriptors, and the discrepancies between actual and possible selves. However, cross-cultural psychological research has questioned whether self-models that emphasize positivity and achievement can be generalized across cultures. This pilot research examines the validity of self-structural and self-discrepancy models of mental health in a sample of 15 Japanese women. It uses the Zajonc (1960) cardsort method to measure schemas and self-discrepancy. Depression was measured with a Japanese version of the CES-D. Consistent with American samples, preliminary findings (N=7) suggest that depression scores are related to number of schemas (r=-.937, p=. 002), and the number of positive schemas (r=-.920, p=. 003), suggesting that the overall centrality of selves and centrality of positive selves may promote mental health. Additionally, while ideal/actual self-discrepancy predicts depression in western sample, ought/actual self-discrepancy was related to depression in this Japanese sample (r=-.845, p=. 017). These findings suggest that while structural factors may predict mental health cross-culturally, the meaning of self-definitions and emotional responses to self-discrepancy are culturally defined, confirming that refinements in models of mental health are warranted. These models are central in the provision of theory-based mental heath promotion.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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