2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160742
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical thinking and participation in health behaviors
Abstract:
Critical thinking and participation in health behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Settersten, Lori, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 573, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414.229.5461
People are being showered with conflicting health information. Critical thinking skills are needed for people to process such information and make decisions about participation in health behaviors. The aims of this study were to examine (a) the relationships between critical thinking and participation in three categories of health behaviors (i.e., health promotion, health protection, and secondary prevention) and (b) whether these relationships were moderated by perceived health status, gender, age, and educational level. A cross-sectional, correlational design was used to study 112 urban, community-dwelling adults aged 18 to 90 (M=55). Participants completed self-administered, written questionnaires. In regression analyses, critical thinking skills were not associated directly with participation in the three categories of health behaviors. However, moderating relationships were found. Among those who reported excellent health or were older, the relationships between critical thinking and participation in some health behaviors were positive. In contrast, among those who reported less than excellent health or more than a high school education or were younger, the relationships were inverse. The relationships differed depending on perceived health status, age, and educational level. Researchers could replicate this study to examine whether the relationships found are similar in more diverse samples.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical thinking and participation in health behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160742-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Critical thinking and participation in health behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Settersten, Lori, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 573, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414.229.5461</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lorisett@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">People are being showered with conflicting health information. Critical thinking skills are needed for people to process such information and make decisions about participation in health behaviors. The aims of this study were to examine (a) the relationships between critical thinking and participation in three categories of health behaviors (i.e., health promotion, health protection, and secondary prevention) and (b) whether these relationships were moderated by perceived health status, gender, age, and educational level. A cross-sectional, correlational design was used to study 112 urban, community-dwelling adults aged 18 to 90 (M=55). Participants completed self-administered, written questionnaires. In regression analyses, critical thinking skills were not associated directly with participation in the three categories of health behaviors. However, moderating relationships were found. Among those who reported excellent health or were older, the relationships between critical thinking and participation in some health behaviors were positive. In contrast, among those who reported less than excellent health or more than a high school education or were younger, the relationships were inverse. The relationships differed depending on perceived health status, age, and educational level. Researchers could replicate this study to examine whether the relationships found are similar in more diverse samples.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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