2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160744
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implications for nursing care relative to coagulopathy after brain injury
Abstract:
Implications for nursing care relative to coagulopathy after brain injury
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Shreve, Wendy, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:St. Vincent Mercy Medical Center
Title:Research Scientist
Contact Address:2213 Cherry Street, Toledo, OH, 43608, USA
Contact Telephone:4192514471
Traumatic brain injury may result in coagulation abnormalities with significant implications for therapy and outcomes. The aims of this study were to (1) estimate the incidence of coagulation abnormalities, defined as either an elevated prothrombin time (PT) or partial thromboplastin time (PTT), in patients with severe blunt head injury, regardless of age or multisystem trauma, and GCS < 8 regardless of age or multi-system trauma, and (2 )to compare patients with and without coagulopathy and those in different age groups in regard to time to surgical intervention, intensive care length of stay, survival, age, temperature, platelet counts, pre-hospital fluid administration, gender, injury severity score (ISS). Consecutive medical record review of head injured patients from March 1996-September 1997 from a Level I Trauma Center at a large community hospital. Mean age was 25 „b 17 years. Mean GCS was 4.39 „b 1.99 (range 3-8). Patients received 1957 „b 1874 ml of fluids in ED 18% (9/50) were hypothermic. Mortality was 29% (18/62). ICU LOS 4.89 days + 5 Mean ISS was 28.52 + 15. We found that fluid administration did correlate with coagulation abnormalities, as well as ISS and mortality and other implications for nursing care relative to secondary brain injury.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplications for nursing care relative to coagulopathy after brain injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160744-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implications for nursing care relative to coagulopathy after brain injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shreve, Wendy, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Vincent Mercy Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2213 Cherry Street, Toledo, OH, 43608, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">4192514471</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wshreve@toledolink.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Traumatic brain injury may result in coagulation abnormalities with significant implications for therapy and outcomes. The aims of this study were to (1) estimate the incidence of coagulation abnormalities, defined as either an elevated prothrombin time (PT) or partial thromboplastin time (PTT), in patients with severe blunt head injury, regardless of age or multisystem trauma, and GCS &lt; 8 regardless of age or multi-system trauma, and (2 )to compare patients with and without coagulopathy and those in different age groups in regard to time to surgical intervention, intensive care length of stay, survival, age, temperature, platelet counts, pre-hospital fluid administration, gender, injury severity score (ISS). Consecutive medical record review of head injured patients from March 1996-September 1997 from a Level I Trauma Center at a large community hospital. Mean age was 25 &bdquo;b 17 years. Mean GCS was 4.39 &bdquo;b 1.99 (range 3-8). Patients received 1957 &bdquo;b 1874 ml of fluids in ED 18% (9/50) were hypothermic. Mortality was 29% (18/62). ICU LOS 4.89 days + 5 Mean ISS was 28.52 + 15. We found that fluid administration did correlate with coagulation abnormalities, as well as ISS and mortality and other implications for nursing care relative to secondary brain injury.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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