Improving Adherence to Asthma Action Plans in Caregiver-Child Dyads using Brief Motivational Interviewing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160748
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Adherence to Asthma Action Plans in Caregiver-Child Dyads using Brief Motivational Interviewing
Abstract:
Improving Adherence to Asthma Action Plans in Caregiver-Child Dyads using Brief Motivational Interviewing
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Stieglitz, Kimberly, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:733 Evans Ave, Kirkwood, MO, 63122, USA
Contact Telephone:3147506062
Co-Authors:K. Stieglitz, D. Loman, N. Westhus, D. Sundara, , Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO; K. Stieglitz, A. Borgmeyer, P. Gyr, S. Thompson, C. Goddard, V. Wright, , St. Louis Childrens' Hospital, St. Louis, MO;
Background: Adherence to medications is a complex issue, and can be viewed as a primary barrier to effective management of asthma and other chronic illnesses. Despite the availability of Asthma Action Plans (AAPs), few families adhere to the regimens written for children, monitor peak flow readings, or use AAPs as reference when symptoms worsen. Children in families who use AAPs experience fewer asthma symptoms and increased quality of life. In order to improve asthma care and decrease societal health care costs, effective educational approaches are necessary. Brief motivational interviews (MI) are increasingly being used in health care as an intervention to improve adherence. Purpose: This pilot study explores the use of MI in moving families toward behavioral change, i.e. greater adherence to Asthma Action Plans. Sample: 64 adult caregiver-child dyads are being recruited during an inpatient admission based on eligibility criteria of asthma diagnosis of >6 months, no prior PICU admissions, and English speaking. Methods: An experimental design was used with random assignment of dyads to either the standard care (education) or intervention group. The intervention group receives standard care and brief MI. The intervention group receives a brief MI boost at one month, and all participants receive phone follow-up at 1, 3 and 6 months, to assess asthma knowledge and management. Results to date are primarily descriptive: 50 dyads have been recruited, 25 per group. 83% are African American. 60% are boys, 40% are girls. 50% of the children are 7-8 years of age. Half the sample did not have an AAP at baseline. 70% of the participants were available at one month. There were no baseline differences in Asthma Control Test (ACT) scores or age between the two groups. Mean baseline ACT composite scores demonstrate suboptimal control in both groups. Mean ACT scores increased through 3 month follow-up in both groups, although decreased at 6 months. Mothers alone are primarily responsible for asthma care of children at 84%. Thirteen dyads have completed 6 months of follow-up. Implications: Results of this pilot study will be used to support the development of an intervention study to improve the utilization of AAPs and evaluate health outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Adherence to Asthma Action Plans in Caregiver-Child Dyads using Brief Motivational Interviewingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160748-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving Adherence to Asthma Action Plans in Caregiver-Child Dyads using Brief Motivational Interviewing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stieglitz, Kimberly, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">733 Evans Ave, Kirkwood, MO, 63122, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3147506062</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kstiegl1@slu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Stieglitz, D. Loman, N. Westhus, D. Sundara, , Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO; K. Stieglitz, A. Borgmeyer, P. Gyr, S. Thompson, C. Goddard, V. Wright, , St. Louis Childrens' Hospital, St. Louis, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Adherence to medications is a complex issue, and can be viewed as a primary barrier to effective management of asthma and other chronic illnesses. Despite the availability of Asthma Action Plans (AAPs), few families adhere to the regimens written for children, monitor peak flow readings, or use AAPs as reference when symptoms worsen. Children in families who use AAPs experience fewer asthma symptoms and increased quality of life. In order to improve asthma care and decrease societal health care costs, effective educational approaches are necessary. Brief motivational interviews (MI) are increasingly being used in health care as an intervention to improve adherence. Purpose: This pilot study explores the use of MI in moving families toward behavioral change, i.e. greater adherence to Asthma Action Plans. Sample: 64 adult caregiver-child dyads are being recruited during an inpatient admission based on eligibility criteria of asthma diagnosis of &gt;6 months, no prior PICU admissions, and English speaking. Methods: An experimental design was used with random assignment of dyads to either the standard care (education) or intervention group. The intervention group receives standard care and brief MI. The intervention group receives a brief MI boost at one month, and all participants receive phone follow-up at 1, 3 and 6 months, to assess asthma knowledge and management. Results to date are primarily descriptive: 50 dyads have been recruited, 25 per group. 83% are African American. 60% are boys, 40% are girls. 50% of the children are 7-8 years of age. Half the sample did not have an AAP at baseline. 70% of the participants were available at one month. There were no baseline differences in Asthma Control Test (ACT) scores or age between the two groups. Mean baseline ACT composite scores demonstrate suboptimal control in both groups. Mean ACT scores increased through 3 month follow-up in both groups, although decreased at 6 months. Mothers alone are primarily responsible for asthma care of children at 84%. Thirteen dyads have completed 6 months of follow-up. Implications: Results of this pilot study will be used to support the development of an intervention study to improve the utilization of AAPs and evaluate health outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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