2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160751
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Breastfeeding Duration in a WIC Sample
Abstract:
Predictors of Breastfeeding Duration in a WIC Sample
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Tenfelde, Sandi, PhD, APN
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University of Chicago
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:2160 South First Ave, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Contact Telephone:312-520-4228
Co-Authors:S.M. Tenfelde, Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; S.M. Tenfelde, F. Lorna, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Background: Increasing the duration of breastfeeding may reduce infant risks of respiratory infections, atopic disorders, and certain childhood cancers, and maternal risks of developing Type 2 diabetes and premenopausal breast cancer. Unfortunately, low-income women who receive services from the federally-funded Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program, breastfeed their infants for significantly shorter durations than low-income women who do not receive WIC services. Aims: During the 12 month-postpartum period, in 300 WIC participants who initiated breastfeeding, we 1) determined when women were most at risk for breastfeeding cessation, and 2) estimated the risk of breastfeeding cessation at each monthly interval as a function of background, motivational, cognitive, and affective predictors. Methods: Using the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior as a framework, we conducted a secondary analysis of temporally sequenced prenatal and postpartum survey and administrative data from a WIC clinic. Discrete-time survival analysis (DTSA) was used to model breastfeeding duration (length of time infant received any breast milk) as a function of the predictor variables. Results: Women in this sample were young (median age=25, range 18-44), unmarried (56%), and had a high school education or less (75%). At 6 months, an estimated 31% of the women continued to breastfeed, and at 12 months, only 6% were breastfeeding. In the best fitting DTSA model, older women of Mexican descent with previous breastfeeding experience and support from family and friends had the lowest risk of early breastfeeding cessation over the 12 month period. Implications: Few investigators have modeled 12-month breastfeeding duration using survival analysis. Given that it costs WIC twice as much to support a formula-fed infant as it does to support a breastfed infant; increasing breastfeeding duration has substantial economic benefits. Findings from this study will be used to develop and test interventions to improve breastfeeding duration in this vulnerable population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Breastfeeding Duration in a WIC Sampleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160751-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Breastfeeding Duration in a WIC Sample</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tenfelde, Sandi, PhD, APN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University of Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2160 South First Ave, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-520-4228</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">stenfelde@luc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.M. Tenfelde, Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; S.M. Tenfelde, F. Lorna, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Increasing the duration of breastfeeding may reduce infant risks of respiratory infections, atopic disorders, and certain childhood cancers, and maternal risks of developing Type 2 diabetes and premenopausal breast cancer. Unfortunately, low-income women who receive services from the federally-funded Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program, breastfeed their infants for significantly shorter durations than low-income women who do not receive WIC services. Aims: During the 12 month-postpartum period, in 300 WIC participants who initiated breastfeeding, we 1) determined when women were most at risk for breastfeeding cessation, and 2) estimated the risk of breastfeeding cessation at each monthly interval as a function of background, motivational, cognitive, and affective predictors. Methods: Using the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior as a framework, we conducted a secondary analysis of temporally sequenced prenatal and postpartum survey and administrative data from a WIC clinic. Discrete-time survival analysis (DTSA) was used to model breastfeeding duration (length of time infant received any breast milk) as a function of the predictor variables. Results: Women in this sample were young (median age=25, range 18-44), unmarried (56%), and had a high school education or less (75%). At 6 months, an estimated 31% of the women continued to breastfeed, and at 12 months, only 6% were breastfeeding. In the best fitting DTSA model, older women of Mexican descent with previous breastfeeding experience and support from family and friends had the lowest risk of early breastfeeding cessation over the 12 month period. Implications: Few investigators have modeled 12-month breastfeeding duration using survival analysis. Given that it costs WIC twice as much to support a formula-fed infant as it does to support a breastfed infant; increasing breastfeeding duration has substantial economic benefits. Findings from this study will be used to develop and test interventions to improve breastfeeding duration in this vulnerable population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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