Rural Elders Describe Community Resources by Figuring it Out with Complex Connections

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160754
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rural Elders Describe Community Resources by Figuring it Out with Complex Connections
Abstract:
Rural Elders Describe Community Resources by Figuring it Out with Complex Connections
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Weierbach, Florence, RN, MPH, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing
Contact Address:985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:(402) 559-2187
Co-Authors:F.M. Weierbach, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
Currently elders comprise 12.4% of the population. In 2030, when the youngest baby boomers turn 65 it is projected 20% of the population will be over 65. Elders are prone to chronic illnesses, such as Heart Failure (HF) that limit their activities of daily living (ADL)/instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). Rural elders have higher rates of institutionalization than urban elders. How the community helps rural elders with ADL/IADL needs lacks clarity especially in regard to their ability to remain at home. The research purpose was to describe the elders' and family members' perceptions of the provision of community services for recently discharged elders with HF requiring assistance with ADL/IADL needs. The specific aims were: 1) to describe the community resources that rural elders with ADL/IADL needs identify as requiring during the first two weeks after discharge, and 2) to describe how rural elders with ADL/IADL needs address them upon returning home. The elder-friendly community provided the study model (Feldman & Oberlink, 2003). Twenty elders with HF, aged 65-90, were recruited during hospitalization. Interviews occurred in their home after discharge. Qualitative analysis included content analysis of interview text using a hermeneutic approach. Initial analysis looked for the elders' experiences, addressing the relationship between ADL/IADL needs and community resources. The analysis resulted in four themes: Accepting Limitations, Disappointments and Unmet Expectations, Figure it Out and Complex Connections. The majority of the elders rated their health as good or fair. Interpretation of the findings indicated that despite the elder's condition, they were able to set up complex arrangements which allowed them to remain at home. The findings assist nurses to understand the elders' experiences post discharge with community resources. Study support was partially provided by the Rural Health Care Research Center, School of Nursing, University of Virginia.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRural Elders Describe Community Resources by Figuring it Out with Complex Connectionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160754-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rural Elders Describe Community Resources by Figuring it Out with Complex Connections</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weierbach, Florence, RN, MPH, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(402) 559-2187</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fweierbach@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">F.M. Weierbach, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Currently elders comprise 12.4% of the population. In 2030, when the youngest baby boomers turn 65 it is projected 20% of the population will be over 65. Elders are prone to chronic illnesses, such as Heart Failure (HF) that limit their activities of daily living (ADL)/instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). Rural elders have higher rates of institutionalization than urban elders. How the community helps rural elders with ADL/IADL needs lacks clarity especially in regard to their ability to remain at home. The research purpose was to describe the elders' and family members' perceptions of the provision of community services for recently discharged elders with HF requiring assistance with ADL/IADL needs. The specific aims were: 1) to describe the community resources that rural elders with ADL/IADL needs identify as requiring during the first two weeks after discharge, and 2) to describe how rural elders with ADL/IADL needs address them upon returning home. The elder-friendly community provided the study model (Feldman &amp; Oberlink, 2003). Twenty elders with HF, aged 65-90, were recruited during hospitalization. Interviews occurred in their home after discharge. Qualitative analysis included content analysis of interview text using a hermeneutic approach. Initial analysis looked for the elders' experiences, addressing the relationship between ADL/IADL needs and community resources. The analysis resulted in four themes: Accepting Limitations, Disappointments and Unmet Expectations, Figure it Out and Complex Connections. The majority of the elders rated their health as good or fair. Interpretation of the findings indicated that despite the elder's condition, they were able to set up complex arrangements which allowed them to remain at home. The findings assist nurses to understand the elders' experiences post discharge with community resources. Study support was partially provided by the Rural Health Care Research Center, School of Nursing, University of Virginia.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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