Development of a Tool to Measure Patients' Perceptions of Spiritual Practices in Health Care Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160755
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of a Tool to Measure Patients' Perceptions of Spiritual Practices in Health Care Settings
Abstract:
Development of a Tool to Measure Patients' Perceptions of Spiritual Practices in Health Care Settings
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:White, Mary, PhD Candidate
P.I. Institution Name:University of Detroit Mercy
Title:McAuley School of Nursing
Contact Address:4001W. McNichols Road, Detroit, MI, 48221-3038, USA
Contact Telephone:313-993-2482
Co-Authors:M.L. White, S. Myers-Schim, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;
A comprehensive review of literature on spirituality and spiritual self-care practices was completed to determine if a valid and reliable instrument was available to measure spiritual practices as a supplement to self-care practices. While a few instruments were found that measured spirituality beliefs and practices, most were from the perspective of the health care provider. None of the instruments were from the patient's perception. To fill this gap in the research on self-care practices, an instrument was developed to measure patients' perceptions of their spiritual practices in daily life. A list of possible items that could be considered as spiritual practices was developed from a review of literature on spirituality. To determine face validity, the list was sent to religious leaders from different religions (e.g., Catholic, Episcopalian, Jewish, Lutheran, Muslim). These leaders reviewed the list and indicated which of the items did not represent spiritual practices. They were also asked to provide suggestions for additional items that could be added to the instrument. A pilot test was completed with 35 patients in a general practice medical office. They completed the Spiritual Self-care Practice Scale (SSCPS) and the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (SSCRS) to determine criterion validity. The SSCRS had been tested for validity and reliability previously. The results of the correlations between the two scales were statistically significant, indicating good criterion validity. The instrument was found to have good internal consistency with a Cronbach alpha coefficient of .92. Based on this preliminary analysis, the SSCPS appears to have good validity and reliability. Further testing is needed to determine construct validity and stability as a measure of reliability.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of a Tool to Measure Patients' Perceptions of Spiritual Practices in Health Care Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160755-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of a Tool to Measure Patients' Perceptions of Spiritual Practices in Health Care Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White, Mary, PhD Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Detroit Mercy</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">McAuley School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4001W. McNichols Road, Detroit, MI, 48221-3038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-993-2482</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">whiteml@udmercy.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.L. White, S. Myers-Schim, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A comprehensive review of literature on spirituality and spiritual self-care practices was completed to determine if a valid and reliable instrument was available to measure spiritual practices as a supplement to self-care practices. While a few instruments were found that measured spirituality beliefs and practices, most were from the perspective of the health care provider. None of the instruments were from the patient's perception. To fill this gap in the research on self-care practices, an instrument was developed to measure patients' perceptions of their spiritual practices in daily life. A list of possible items that could be considered as spiritual practices was developed from a review of literature on spirituality. To determine face validity, the list was sent to religious leaders from different religions (e.g., Catholic, Episcopalian, Jewish, Lutheran, Muslim). These leaders reviewed the list and indicated which of the items did not represent spiritual practices. They were also asked to provide suggestions for additional items that could be added to the instrument. A pilot test was completed with 35 patients in a general practice medical office. They completed the Spiritual Self-care Practice Scale (SSCPS) and the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (SSCRS) to determine criterion validity. The SSCRS had been tested for validity and reliability previously. The results of the correlations between the two scales were statistically significant, indicating good criterion validity. The instrument was found to have good internal consistency with a Cronbach alpha coefficient of .92. Based on this preliminary analysis, the SSCPS appears to have good validity and reliability. Further testing is needed to determine construct validity and stability as a measure of reliability.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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