2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160759
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Personal Factors that Influence Motivation in Routine Pap Smear Testing
Abstract:
Personal Factors that Influence Motivation in Routine Pap Smear Testing
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ackerson, Kelly, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Western Michigan University
Title:Bronson School of Nursing
Contact Address:1903 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008-5345, USA
Contact Telephone:269-387-8161
Co-Authors:K. Ackerson, Bronson School of Nursing, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI;
Purpose: Explore personal influencing factors that contribute to Pap smear testing to better understand the motivating factors behind why lower resourced African American women (AAW) are not tested. In order to address these factors, women who obtained routine Pap smears (every 1-3 years) as well as those who did not were included. Theoretical Framework: The Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior was used as a guiding framework to qualitatively explore interactions between the women's social influences and previous healthcare experience to determine what affects their cognitive appraisal regarding the importance of cervical cancer screening. Subjects: Face-to-face interviews with 24 low-income AAW (aged 19 to 60) were conducted. Eleven obtained routine screening and 13 did not. Methods: Data were analyzed using a constant comparison approach to collect and evaluate data inductively and arrive at an understanding of major themes and comparisons across groups. Results: The routine-use group was socially influenced to value preventative healthcare while the non-routine-use group was not. Previous healthcare experiences with having a Pap and pelvic exam was positive for the routine-use group and negative for the non-routine-use group. Cognitively, both groups believed Paps tested for cancer and STDs, and vulnerability to cervical cancer was thought to run in families, that they were either safe from risk or hoped that the odds were in their favor. An unexpected finding was a history of trauma (n=9) (sexual, physical, and medical) among the non-routine-use group that elicited negative perceptions towards their previous healthcare experience contributing to avoidance of screening. Conclusions: The routine-use group, as long as they maintain motivation for routine testing, is not a major focus. The non-routine-use group is a focus because there is the potential to change behavior if we can better understand the nature of their behavior in not having Paps. The implications are that they do not seek out routine gynecological care, increasing their risk of undetected cervical cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePersonal Factors that Influence Motivation in Routine Pap Smear Testingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160759-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Personal Factors that Influence Motivation in Routine Pap Smear Testing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ackerson, Kelly, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Western Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Bronson School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1903 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008-5345, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">269-387-8161</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kelly.ackerson@wmich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Ackerson, Bronson School of Nursing, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Explore personal influencing factors that contribute to Pap smear testing to better understand the motivating factors behind why lower resourced African American women (AAW) are not tested. In order to address these factors, women who obtained routine Pap smears (every 1-3 years) as well as those who did not were included. Theoretical Framework: The Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior was used as a guiding framework to qualitatively explore interactions between the women's social influences and previous healthcare experience to determine what affects their cognitive appraisal regarding the importance of cervical cancer screening. Subjects: Face-to-face interviews with 24 low-income AAW (aged 19 to 60) were conducted. Eleven obtained routine screening and 13 did not. Methods: Data were analyzed using a constant comparison approach to collect and evaluate data inductively and arrive at an understanding of major themes and comparisons across groups. Results: The routine-use group was socially influenced to value preventative healthcare while the non-routine-use group was not. Previous healthcare experiences with having a Pap and pelvic exam was positive for the routine-use group and negative for the non-routine-use group. Cognitively, both groups believed Paps tested for cancer and STDs, and vulnerability to cervical cancer was thought to run in families, that they were either safe from risk or hoped that the odds were in their favor. An unexpected finding was a history of trauma (n=9) (sexual, physical, and medical) among the non-routine-use group that elicited negative perceptions towards their previous healthcare experience contributing to avoidance of screening. Conclusions: The routine-use group, as long as they maintain motivation for routine testing, is not a major focus. The non-routine-use group is a focus because there is the potential to change behavior if we can better understand the nature of their behavior in not having Paps. The implications are that they do not seek out routine gynecological care, increasing their risk of undetected cervical cancer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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