2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160760
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Experimental Study of Tai Chi and Older Adults: Lessons Learned
Abstract:
Experimental Study of Tai Chi and Older Adults: Lessons Learned
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Adler, Patricia
P.I. Institution Name:Cleveland Clinic
Contact Address:9500 Euclid Ave. W1, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA
Contact Telephone:216-445-3457
Co-Authors:P. Adler, Nursing, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH;
Purpose. The purpose of this presentation is to report the lessons learned from an experimental study of Tai Chi on pain and function in older adults with osteoarthritis. Problem. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of disability in older adults. Exercise has the potential to improve pain and function in elders with OA. Tai Chi is a low intensity exercise alternative that is gentle on joints, and may be more acceptable to elders considering an exercise program. Theoretical/Conceputal Framework. Modified Nagi's Model of Disability. Methods. The sample consisted of 14 community-dwelling adults ages equal to or greater than 60 years with knee and/or hip pain, no cognitive impairment, or involvement in an exercise program. Participants were randomly assigned to either a Tai Chi or Bingo group. Both groups attended 10 weekly, 1-hour sessions. Pre and posttest measures of pain and function were collected 1 week prior to, and 1 week after study completion, and pain and analgesic usage were measured weekly. Results. The number of variables of interest was reduced from 9 to 2 (pain and muscle strength) because of small sample size and increased risk of Type I error with multiple analyses. Pain and muscle strength were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U and were not significant. The remaining variables (anxiety, depressive symptoms, balance, gait, mobility, and life tasks) were examined for trends. All but one variable (IADL) showed some improvement. Sample size was due primarily to challenges with recruitment: not enough interest, Tai Chi offered at local facilities, not enough pain, already in an exercise program, and not interested in bingo. A total of 24 facilities were contacted during a 3 month period, and 18 information meetings were conducted. Relevance to Nursing. The study will serve as a feasibility study for future Tai Chi research utilizing knowledge obtained from lessons learned.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExperimental Study of Tai Chi and Older Adults: Lessons Learneden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160760-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Experimental Study of Tai Chi and Older Adults: Lessons Learned</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adler, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cleveland Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9500 Euclid Ave. W1, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-445-3457</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patricia.adler@sbcglobal.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P. Adler, Nursing, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose. The purpose of this presentation is to report the lessons learned from an experimental study of Tai Chi on pain and function in older adults with osteoarthritis. Problem. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of disability in older adults. Exercise has the potential to improve pain and function in elders with OA. Tai Chi is a low intensity exercise alternative that is gentle on joints, and may be more acceptable to elders considering an exercise program. Theoretical/Conceputal Framework. Modified Nagi's Model of Disability. Methods. The sample consisted of 14 community-dwelling adults ages equal to or greater than 60 years with knee and/or hip pain, no cognitive impairment, or involvement in an exercise program. Participants were randomly assigned to either a Tai Chi or Bingo group. Both groups attended 10 weekly, 1-hour sessions. Pre and posttest measures of pain and function were collected 1 week prior to, and 1 week after study completion, and pain and analgesic usage were measured weekly. Results. The number of variables of interest was reduced from 9 to 2 (pain and muscle strength) because of small sample size and increased risk of Type I error with multiple analyses. Pain and muscle strength were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U and were not significant. The remaining variables (anxiety, depressive symptoms, balance, gait, mobility, and life tasks) were examined for trends. All but one variable (IADL) showed some improvement. Sample size was due primarily to challenges with recruitment: not enough interest, Tai Chi offered at local facilities, not enough pain, already in an exercise program, and not interested in bingo. A total of 24 facilities were contacted during a 3 month period, and 18 information meetings were conducted. Relevance to Nursing. The study will serve as a feasibility study for future Tai Chi research utilizing knowledge obtained from lessons learned.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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