2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160762
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An immersion journey: Transcultural nursing lessons in Nicaragua
Abstract:
An immersion journey: Transcultural nursing lessons in Nicaragua
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Altman, Mary Ilu, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:502 North University Street, Johnson Hall of Nursing, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
Contact Telephone:7654949056
Co-Authors:M. Altman, Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN;
The US Census 2007 population estimates reported that there are more than 47 million Hispanics living in the United Sates. It has been predicted that the population will continue to grow as a result of immigration patterns and a Hispanic baby boom. As a result, healthcare professionals are interacting with a large Hispanic clientele in hospitals, clinics and pharmacies across the nation. In Indiana, it was estimated that 4.8% of total residents are of Hispanic origin (U.S. Census 2006). In some other states, like California, Texas and Illinois, the situation is more precarious. The new demographics have created a series of challenges for healthcare providers, for example, in the United States, there are not enough healthcare workers who speak Spanish (Spector, 2008); and according to Leininger (1992), less than 15% of the graduate nursing students have enrolled in one transcultural course, and fewer than that have experienced mentorship in a transcultural clinical or direct field experience (Hughes, 2007). The Purdue School of Nursing immersion program in Nicaragua was developed as an elective summer course, for its students to acquire and increase cultural and linguistic skills, in order to meet the increasing demand for culturally relevant care. In May 2008, a team of two nursing faculty and twelve students travelled to the largest of Central America countries. Upon completion of the two-week immersion experience, the students submitted a journal of their impressions while observing healthcare delivery and culture in Nicaragua. The presentation highlights pivotal moments of the journey of acculturation experienced by the students in a foreign culture: unique and valuable transcultural lessons, learned among the marginalized citizens of a developing nation, viable for nursing practice and for a lifetime promoting social justice and human rights.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn immersion journey: Transcultural nursing lessons in Nicaraguaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160762-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An immersion journey: Transcultural nursing lessons in Nicaragua</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Altman, Mary Ilu, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">502 North University Street, Johnson Hall of Nursing, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">7654949056</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mialtman@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Altman, Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The US Census 2007 population estimates reported that there are more than 47 million Hispanics living in the United Sates. It has been predicted that the population will continue to grow as a result of immigration patterns and a Hispanic baby boom. As a result, healthcare professionals are interacting with a large Hispanic clientele in hospitals, clinics and pharmacies across the nation. In Indiana, it was estimated that 4.8% of total residents are of Hispanic origin (U.S. Census 2006). In some other states, like California, Texas and Illinois, the situation is more precarious. The new demographics have created a series of challenges for healthcare providers, for example, in the United States, there are not enough healthcare workers who speak Spanish (Spector, 2008); and according to Leininger (1992), less than 15% of the graduate nursing students have enrolled in one transcultural course, and fewer than that have experienced mentorship in a transcultural clinical or direct field experience (Hughes, 2007). The Purdue School of Nursing immersion program in Nicaragua was developed as an elective summer course, for its students to acquire and increase cultural and linguistic skills, in order to meet the increasing demand for culturally relevant care. In May 2008, a team of two nursing faculty and twelve students travelled to the largest of Central America countries. Upon completion of the two-week immersion experience, the students submitted a journal of their impressions while observing healthcare delivery and culture in Nicaragua. The presentation highlights pivotal moments of the journey of acculturation experienced by the students in a foreign culture: unique and valuable transcultural lessons, learned among the marginalized citizens of a developing nation, viable for nursing practice and for a lifetime promoting social justice and human rights.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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