2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160765
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measurement of Cognitive Function in Chronic Heart Failure
Abstract:
Measurement of Cognitive Function in Chronic Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bauer, Lisa, PhD, ANP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:14404 S. 24th Street, Bellevue, NE, 68123, USA
Contact Telephone:402-932-1849
Co-Authors:L. Bauer, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; B. Pozehl, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE; J. Johnson, Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA;
Problem Statement: Cognitive deficits are present in approximately 28% to 58% of heart failure (HF) patients. Assessment of cognitive function is critical in order to provide optimal care to HF patients. Traditional neuropsychological batteries take up to 8 hours to administer, which is less than optimal for HF patients with fatigue. In addition, neuropsychological tests have not been validated in the HF population. The purpose of this pilot study was to obtain feasibility data for use of a brief neuropsychological battery. This data will guide a larger study examining measurement of cognitive function and estimation of reliability and validity indices in a HF population. Methods: An exploratory, descriptive design was used. Ten stable NYHA class II-IV HF patients (mean age of 69 + 13 years and LVEF of 40% + 9%) were recruited from a large Midwestern HF clinic. Subjects completed the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), letter fluency (number of D words in one minute), Trail Making Test Parts A and B (TMT-A/B), and Finger Tapping Test (FTT). This battery of tests assesses multiple domains of cognitive function, including attention, memory and executive function. Data included time for battery completion, subject tolerance and comments concerning the testing, age, previous education, HF duration, and LVEF. Results: The mean time of administration for the complete battery was 40 + 7.5 minutes. One subject required a break during administration. The FTT was the only test in this battery that was problematic. Scores on this test were confounded by arthritis or carpal tunnel in 8 of the 10 subjects. Cognitive deficits noted in this sample included attention (40% prevalence), memory (30% prevalence), and executive function (60% prevalence). Thus, cognitive deficits documented with this battery were consistent with results from previous HF literature. Implications: The battery was sensitive in terms of detecting cognitive deficits and feasible in terms of administration time and prevention of subject fatigue. An alternative measure of psychomotor speed is recommended. Additional study with larger samples is needed to document reliability and validity for this neuropsychological battery in HF patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasurement of Cognitive Function in Chronic Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160765-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measurement of Cognitive Function in Chronic Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bauer, Lisa, PhD, ANP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">14404 S. 24th Street, Bellevue, NE, 68123, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-932-1849</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lisa.bauer@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L. Bauer, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; B. Pozehl, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE; J. Johnson, Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Statement: Cognitive deficits are present in approximately 28% to 58% of heart failure (HF) patients. Assessment of cognitive function is critical in order to provide optimal care to HF patients. Traditional neuropsychological batteries take up to 8 hours to administer, which is less than optimal for HF patients with fatigue. In addition, neuropsychological tests have not been validated in the HF population. The purpose of this pilot study was to obtain feasibility data for use of a brief neuropsychological battery. This data will guide a larger study examining measurement of cognitive function and estimation of reliability and validity indices in a HF population. Methods: An exploratory, descriptive design was used. Ten stable NYHA class II-IV HF patients (mean age of 69 + 13 years and LVEF of 40% + 9%) were recruited from a large Midwestern HF clinic. Subjects completed the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), letter fluency (number of D words in one minute), Trail Making Test Parts A and B (TMT-A/B), and Finger Tapping Test (FTT). This battery of tests assesses multiple domains of cognitive function, including attention, memory and executive function. Data included time for battery completion, subject tolerance and comments concerning the testing, age, previous education, HF duration, and LVEF. Results: The mean time of administration for the complete battery was 40 + 7.5 minutes. One subject required a break during administration. The FTT was the only test in this battery that was problematic. Scores on this test were confounded by arthritis or carpal tunnel in 8 of the 10 subjects. Cognitive deficits noted in this sample included attention (40% prevalence), memory (30% prevalence), and executive function (60% prevalence). Thus, cognitive deficits documented with this battery were consistent with results from previous HF literature. Implications: The battery was sensitive in terms of detecting cognitive deficits and feasible in terms of administration time and prevention of subject fatigue. An alternative measure of psychomotor speed is recommended. Additional study with larger samples is needed to document reliability and validity for this neuropsychological battery in HF patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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