Psychological and Biological Correlates of Fatigue after Mild-To-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160766
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychological and Biological Correlates of Fatigue after Mild-To-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury
Abstract:
Psychological and Biological Correlates of Fatigue after Mild-To-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bay, Esther, BSN MSN PhD
P.I. Institution Name:MI State University
Contact Address:A417 W. Fee, Center for Nursing Research, E. Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:1517 3538681
Co-Authors:E. Bay, E. Xie, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI; E. Bay, E. Xie, , Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI;
Problem: Fatigue is a commonly occurring problem following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and has been reported to affect up to 70% of those with TBI. It impacts day-to-day function, quality of life, and one's ability to achieve maximal benefits of rehabilitation therapies. Still, we know little about its physiological and psychological underpinnings. Framework: Recently it was suggested that fatigue after TBI is the result of the brain injury (N=223) Because brain injury has been associated with axonal sheering, swelling, changes in brain metabolism and hormonal depletions, it is possible that this fatigue may reflect a form of adrenal hormone exhaustion as reported in conditions associated with chronic stress, vital exhaustion or 'burn-out'. Purpose: to examine whether physiological and psychological correlates associated with the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA-axis) stress system are associated with fatigue. Methods: Explanatory relationships between chronic perceived stress, cortisol response (area under the curve) and post-traumatic brain injury fatigue were evaluated in persons recruited from outpatient rehabilitation clinics. Seventy-five injured persons with mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury and their relatives/significant other participated in this cross-sectional study. Procedures & results: Using interviews and self-reported data from the Neurofunctional Behavioral Inventory, the Perceived Stress Scale, the Profile of Mood States-fatigue subscale, the McGill Pain Scale, and salivary cortisol self-collected over a 12-hour period (N=50), we found 1) hypocortisolemia was present, 2) perceived chronic stress explained 40 % of fatigue until depressive symptoms and pain were in the model. We concluded that depressive symptoms, present pain intensity and perceived chronic stress explained nearly 51% of the variability in post-TBI fatigue. Relevance: These results suggest that symptom management and stress management interventions as suggested in the CDC Acute Concussion Evaluation guidelines may be beneficial in reducing this common symptom.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychological and Biological Correlates of Fatigue after Mild-To-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160766-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychological and Biological Correlates of Fatigue after Mild-To-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bay, Esther, BSN MSN PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">MI State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">A417 W. Fee, Center for Nursing Research, E. Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">1517 3538681</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">baye@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E. Bay, E. Xie, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI; E. Bay, E. Xie, , Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Fatigue is a commonly occurring problem following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and has been reported to affect up to 70% of those with TBI. It impacts day-to-day function, quality of life, and one's ability to achieve maximal benefits of rehabilitation therapies. Still, we know little about its physiological and psychological underpinnings. Framework: Recently it was suggested that fatigue after TBI is the result of the brain injury (N=223) Because brain injury has been associated with axonal sheering, swelling, changes in brain metabolism and hormonal depletions, it is possible that this fatigue may reflect a form of adrenal hormone exhaustion as reported in conditions associated with chronic stress, vital exhaustion or 'burn-out'. Purpose: to examine whether physiological and psychological correlates associated with the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA-axis) stress system are associated with fatigue. Methods: Explanatory relationships between chronic perceived stress, cortisol response (area under the curve) and post-traumatic brain injury fatigue were evaluated in persons recruited from outpatient rehabilitation clinics. Seventy-five injured persons with mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury and their relatives/significant other participated in this cross-sectional study. Procedures &amp; results: Using interviews and self-reported data from the Neurofunctional Behavioral Inventory, the Perceived Stress Scale, the Profile of Mood States-fatigue subscale, the McGill Pain Scale, and salivary cortisol self-collected over a 12-hour period (N=50), we found 1) hypocortisolemia was present, 2) perceived chronic stress explained 40 % of fatigue until depressive symptoms and pain were in the model. We concluded that depressive symptoms, present pain intensity and perceived chronic stress explained nearly 51% of the variability in post-TBI fatigue. Relevance: These results suggest that symptom management and stress management interventions as suggested in the CDC Acute Concussion Evaluation guidelines may be beneficial in reducing this common symptom.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.