Anxiety as a Mediating Variable to Learning Outcomes in a Human Patient Simulation Experience: A Mixed Methods Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160767
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Anxiety as a Mediating Variable to Learning Outcomes in a Human Patient Simulation Experience: A Mixed Methods Study
Abstract:
Anxiety as a Mediating Variable to Learning Outcomes in a Human Patient Simulation Experience: A Mixed Methods Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Beischel, Kelly, MSN, MEd
P.I. Institution Name:Xavier University
Title:Kelly Beischel
Contact Address:170 Magnolia AVe, Cincinnati, OH, 45246, USA
Contact Telephone:513 9315177
Co-Authors:K. Beischel, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH;
Healthcare educators are being challenged to use innovative teaching strategies as a result of concurrent changes in the healthcare system and the evolution of the digital learner. In response to this challenge, the use of high fidelity human patient simulation (HPS) as a teaching tool has become increasingly popular among many nurse educators. Although this teaching tool is anecdotally leading to positive learning outcomes, educators are calling for more research concerning the efficacy of HPS. It is important, though, to explore potential mediating variables that may affect the educational outcome of a HPS experience before the effectiveness of simulation can be empirically determined. Yet, there are no such studies. The primary purpose of this mixed methods study is to examine the effects of individual differences on cognitive learning outcomes when using HPS as a teaching tool. A secondary purpose includes examining the indirect effect individual differences have on cognitive learning outcomes as mediated through anxiety. This study also explores the qualities of HPS that affect anxiety. Although the HPS is a teaching tool, a simulation experience places students in a situation where they are expected to perform in the presence of peers and are critiqued on that performance. This experience is similar to testing situations. Thus, the theory of test anxiety is the theoretical framework for this study. This study will use a triangulation design with a validating quantitative data model whereby the qualitative data will provide an in-depth understanding of the quantitative results. Structured equation modeling will be used to determine the direct and indirect effects on cognitive learning outcomes. Faculty members have reported anxiety in students as a response to the stress of participating in a simulation learning experience. The study being proposed by this researcher will advance nursing education science and provide needed evidence to inform HPS teaching practices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnxiety as a Mediating Variable to Learning Outcomes in a Human Patient Simulation Experience: A Mixed Methods Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160767-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Anxiety as a Mediating Variable to Learning Outcomes in a Human Patient Simulation Experience: A Mixed Methods Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beischel, Kelly, MSN, MEd</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Xavier University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Kelly Beischel</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">170 Magnolia AVe, Cincinnati, OH, 45246, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513 9315177</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">beischelk@gmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Beischel, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Healthcare educators are being challenged to use innovative teaching strategies as a result of concurrent changes in the healthcare system and the evolution of the digital learner. In response to this challenge, the use of high fidelity human patient simulation (HPS) as a teaching tool has become increasingly popular among many nurse educators. Although this teaching tool is anecdotally leading to positive learning outcomes, educators are calling for more research concerning the efficacy of HPS. It is important, though, to explore potential mediating variables that may affect the educational outcome of a HPS experience before the effectiveness of simulation can be empirically determined. Yet, there are no such studies. The primary purpose of this mixed methods study is to examine the effects of individual differences on cognitive learning outcomes when using HPS as a teaching tool. A secondary purpose includes examining the indirect effect individual differences have on cognitive learning outcomes as mediated through anxiety. This study also explores the qualities of HPS that affect anxiety. Although the HPS is a teaching tool, a simulation experience places students in a situation where they are expected to perform in the presence of peers and are critiqued on that performance. This experience is similar to testing situations. Thus, the theory of test anxiety is the theoretical framework for this study. This study will use a triangulation design with a validating quantitative data model whereby the qualitative data will provide an in-depth understanding of the quantitative results. Structured equation modeling will be used to determine the direct and indirect effects on cognitive learning outcomes. Faculty members have reported anxiety in students as a response to the stress of participating in a simulation learning experience. The study being proposed by this researcher will advance nursing education science and provide needed evidence to inform HPS teaching practices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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