Patient and Nurse Perception of Stress-Related Factors in the Hospital Bedspace Environment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160768
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient and Nurse Perception of Stress-Related Factors in the Hospital Bedspace Environment
Abstract:
Patient and Nurse Perception of Stress-Related Factors in the Hospital Bedspace Environment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bernhofer, Esther, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Cleveland Clinic
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:2600 Grantwood Drive, Parma, OH, 44134, USA
Contact Telephone:440-843-8304
Co-Authors:E. Bernhofer, P. Adler, Nursing Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; M. Satava, Quality and Patient Safety, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; J. Bena, Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH;
Problem: The hospital bedspace environment can be stressful for patients and nurses. It is both the patients' personal space and the nurses' workspace. Stress factors within the bedspace may be perceived differently by patients and nurses. Little is known about perceived stress-related factors in the hospital patient bedspace and the potential consequences. Purpose: To examine factors perceived by patients and nurses as stressful in the hospital bed space, and assess the difference in nurse/patient perception of these factors. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Lazarus's transactional model of stress and coping. Methodology/Design: A descriptive comparative design was used to assess 30 nurses (m=37 years) and 30 patients (m=61 years) on a medical-surgical unit. Participants were asked to complete a survey consisting of the same 10-items using a 5-point Likert scale (0=not stressful, 4=always stressful). Content validity was 92%. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze demographic information and stress-related factors; Mann Whitney U nonparametric test was used to compare nurse/patient responses. Analysis: Median scores for patients and nurses were similar on 4 items (1.0-2.0), and different on 6 items (0.5-3.0); nurses reported higher stress on these 6 items. Significant differences were found on 50% (n=5) of the items (small bedspace, trash on floor, large medical equipment, medical supplies, tripping hazards) using p less or equal to .005 (adjusted for 10 items). Patients reported small bedspace as "always stressful" and nurses reported trash on the floor as "always stressful." Both patients and nurses reported natural window lighting as "not stressful." Interpretation of findings: Patients' and nurses' perception of stress-related factors in the bedspace differed significantly 50% of the time. Yet nurses report higher stress in these items compared to patients. Relevance to nursing practice: Knowledge of perceived stress-related factors in the bedspace by patients and nurses can provide better understanding and support for interventions to reduce stress and its consequences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient and Nurse Perception of Stress-Related Factors in the Hospital Bedspace Environmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160768-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patient and Nurse Perception of Stress-Related Factors in the Hospital Bedspace Environment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bernhofer, Esther, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cleveland Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2600 Grantwood Drive, Parma, OH, 44134, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">440-843-8304</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eib3@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E. Bernhofer, P. Adler, Nursing Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; M. Satava, Quality and Patient Safety, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; J. Bena, Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: The hospital bedspace environment can be stressful for patients and nurses. It is both the patients' personal space and the nurses' workspace. Stress factors within the bedspace may be perceived differently by patients and nurses. Little is known about perceived stress-related factors in the hospital patient bedspace and the potential consequences. Purpose: To examine factors perceived by patients and nurses as stressful in the hospital bed space, and assess the difference in nurse/patient perception of these factors. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Lazarus's transactional model of stress and coping. Methodology/Design: A descriptive comparative design was used to assess 30 nurses (m=37 years) and 30 patients (m=61 years) on a medical-surgical unit. Participants were asked to complete a survey consisting of the same 10-items using a 5-point Likert scale (0=not stressful, 4=always stressful). Content validity was 92%. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze demographic information and stress-related factors; Mann Whitney U nonparametric test was used to compare nurse/patient responses. Analysis: Median scores for patients and nurses were similar on 4 items (1.0-2.0), and different on 6 items (0.5-3.0); nurses reported higher stress on these 6 items. Significant differences were found on 50% (n=5) of the items (small bedspace, trash on floor, large medical equipment, medical supplies, tripping hazards) using p less or equal to .005 (adjusted for 10 items). Patients reported small bedspace as &quot;always stressful&quot; and nurses reported trash on the floor as &quot;always stressful.&quot; Both patients and nurses reported natural window lighting as &quot;not stressful.&quot; Interpretation of findings: Patients' and nurses' perception of stress-related factors in the bedspace differed significantly 50% of the time. Yet nurses report higher stress in these items compared to patients. Relevance to nursing practice: Knowledge of perceived stress-related factors in the bedspace by patients and nurses can provide better understanding and support for interventions to reduce stress and its consequences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.