Advance Care Treatment Plan (ACT-Plan) for African American Family Caregivers: A Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160769
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advance Care Treatment Plan (ACT-Plan) for African American Family Caregivers: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
Advance Care Treatment Plan (ACT-Plan) for African American Family Caregivers: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bonner, Gloria, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois@Chicago
Title:Biobehavioral Science
Contact Address:845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-567-9072
Co-Authors:G.J. Bonner, D. Ingram, D.J. Wilkie, C.E. Ferrans, E. Moore-Burke, S. MacNeill, Biobehavioral Science, Univeristy of Illinois @ Chicago, Chicago, IL;
PROBLEM: Less than 9% of African Americans (AA) have made advance care plans as opposed to 20% of comparable white Americans. End-of-life treatment decisions such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), mechanical ventilation (MV) and tube feeding (TF) should be made in advance before life threatening medical crisis occurs. AIM: The study aim was to determine the feasibility of the ACT-Plan educational intervention, framed by Kolb's Model of Experiential Learning Theory (ELT). METHODS: Using a one-group pre-post design, 4 weekly face-to-face, 1 hour, interactive sessions were conducted with 7 caregivers (6 or 86% women, mean age 58, SD 9.7). Care receivers were AAs with dementia from stroke and Alzheimer's disease. All sessions were held at an adult day care center in an urban AA community where the care receivers were enrolled. Each session focused on "teaching around Kolb's circle" using culturally appropriate teaching methods such as lectures, storytelling, and shared experiences. An advanced practice nurse facilitated the interactive sessions. Content centered on advance care planning, dementia, CPR, MV, and TF. RESULTS: All 7 participants attended all sessions. They reported that: the content was appropriate; materials were easily understood; their knowledge increased about advance medical planning, dementia, CPR, MV, and TF; and they received benefits from facts learned about dementia, CPR, MV and TF from experts. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary findings strongly suggest that ACT-Plan, framed by Kolb's ELT, is feasible and appropriate for AA caregivers. The ACT-Plan education program was well received and is now being tested for other feasibility parameters in a NIH-funded study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvance Care Treatment Plan (ACT-Plan) for African American Family Caregivers: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160769-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Advance Care Treatment Plan (ACT-Plan) for African American Family Caregivers: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bonner, Gloria, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois@Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Biobehavioral Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-567-9072</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gjbonner@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">G.J. Bonner, D. Ingram, D.J. Wilkie, C.E. Ferrans, E. Moore-Burke, S. MacNeill, Biobehavioral Science, Univeristy of Illinois @ Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PROBLEM: Less than 9% of African Americans (AA) have made advance care plans as opposed to 20% of comparable white Americans. End-of-life treatment decisions such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), mechanical ventilation (MV) and tube feeding (TF) should be made in advance before life threatening medical crisis occurs. AIM: The study aim was to determine the feasibility of the ACT-Plan educational intervention, framed by Kolb's Model of Experiential Learning Theory (ELT). METHODS: Using a one-group pre-post design, 4 weekly face-to-face, 1 hour, interactive sessions were conducted with 7 caregivers (6 or 86% women, mean age 58, SD 9.7). Care receivers were AAs with dementia from stroke and Alzheimer's disease. All sessions were held at an adult day care center in an urban AA community where the care receivers were enrolled. Each session focused on &quot;teaching around Kolb's circle&quot; using culturally appropriate teaching methods such as lectures, storytelling, and shared experiences. An advanced practice nurse facilitated the interactive sessions. Content centered on advance care planning, dementia, CPR, MV, and TF. RESULTS: All 7 participants attended all sessions. They reported that: the content was appropriate; materials were easily understood; their knowledge increased about advance medical planning, dementia, CPR, MV, and TF; and they received benefits from facts learned about dementia, CPR, MV and TF from experts. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary findings strongly suggest that ACT-Plan, framed by Kolb's ELT, is feasible and appropriate for AA caregivers. The ACT-Plan education program was well received and is now being tested for other feasibility parameters in a NIH-funded study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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