Impairment of Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation Associated with Binge Alcohol Drinking in Young Adult Rats

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160771
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impairment of Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation Associated with Binge Alcohol Drinking in Young Adult Rats
Abstract:
Impairment of Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation Associated with Binge Alcohol Drinking in Young Adult Rats
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Briones, Tess, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Biobehavioral Health Science
Contact Address:845 S. Damen Ave, M/C 802, Rm 750, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-355-3142
Co-Authors:T.L. Briones, M. Piano, L. Gu, H. Darwish, Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Most studies on alcohol effects in the brain have primarily focused on the postnatal period and in chronic consumption in adulthood. However, few studies have reported the effects of binge-like alcohol consumption in young adults. In the present study, we examined the effects of binge-like drinking on cell proliferation in the hippocampus, brain region involved in learning and memory and emotional processing, using an animal model. Ten adult male Sprague-Dawley rats approximately 2 months old weighing 220-225 grams (n = 6 binge-alcohol and n = 4 saline controls) were included in the study. Rats were individually housed and allowed to acclimate for one week with free access to food and water before the binge drinking protocol was started. Binge protocol was carried out for 5 weeks and consisted of daily alcohol (mixed with water) administration via intragastric gavage for 5 consecutive days followed by 2 off days. Control rats were given normal saline via intragastric gavage in the same number of days. Each gavage contained 30% (v/v) ethanol and a total of 5 grams/Kg while control rats received the same volume of saline. Blood alcohol level was measured before starting the binge-like protocol and one hour after alcohol administration every week. Rats were sacrificed after 5 weeks and the brains were removed and processed for immunohistochemistry. Our results showed an average peak of blood alcohol level of 222.5 plus or minus 39.3 mg/dL. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significantly decreased Ki67-positive (marker for proliferating cells) cells in the hippocampal region of rats that received alcohol compared to the saline control animals (2802 vs. 4109 cells/mm3). Our immunohistrochemistry results also showed decreased Sir2 (sirtuin, a histone deacetylase) expression in the hippocampus. Taken together, our data demonstrate that binge alcohol drinking resulted in decrease proliferation of neural progenitor cells possibly due to the epigenetic modifications of histones. Clinically, these results are relevant in understanding the behavioral consequences of binge-like alcohol consumption in young adults. <i>Supported by AA015578 and NR007666</i>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpairment of Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation Associated with Binge Alcohol Drinking in Young Adult Ratsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160771-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impairment of Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation Associated with Binge Alcohol Drinking in Young Adult Rats</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Briones, Tess, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Biobehavioral Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen Ave, M/C 802, Rm 750, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-355-3142</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tbriones@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T.L. Briones, M. Piano, L. Gu, H. Darwish, Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Most studies on alcohol effects in the brain have primarily focused on the postnatal period and in chronic consumption in adulthood. However, few studies have reported the effects of binge-like alcohol consumption in young adults. In the present study, we examined the effects of binge-like drinking on cell proliferation in the hippocampus, brain region involved in learning and memory and emotional processing, using an animal model. Ten adult male Sprague-Dawley rats approximately 2 months old weighing 220-225 grams (n = 6 binge-alcohol and n = 4 saline controls) were included in the study. Rats were individually housed and allowed to acclimate for one week with free access to food and water before the binge drinking protocol was started. Binge protocol was carried out for 5 weeks and consisted of daily alcohol (mixed with water) administration via intragastric gavage for 5 consecutive days followed by 2 off days. Control rats were given normal saline via intragastric gavage in the same number of days. Each gavage contained 30% (v/v) ethanol and a total of 5 grams/Kg while control rats received the same volume of saline. Blood alcohol level was measured before starting the binge-like protocol and one hour after alcohol administration every week. Rats were sacrificed after 5 weeks and the brains were removed and processed for immunohistochemistry. Our results showed an average peak of blood alcohol level of 222.5 plus or minus 39.3 mg/dL. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significantly decreased Ki67-positive (marker for proliferating cells) cells in the hippocampal region of rats that received alcohol compared to the saline control animals (2802 vs. 4109 cells/mm3). Our immunohistrochemistry results also showed decreased Sir2 (sirtuin, a histone deacetylase) expression in the hippocampus. Taken together, our data demonstrate that binge alcohol drinking resulted in decrease proliferation of neural progenitor cells possibly due to the epigenetic modifications of histones. Clinically, these results are relevant in understanding the behavioral consequences of binge-like alcohol consumption in young adults. &lt;i&gt;Supported by AA015578 and NR007666&lt;/i&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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