2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160772
Type:
Presentation
Title:
BSN Students' Conceptions of Learning and Study Tactics
Abstract:
BSN Students' Conceptions of Learning and Study Tactics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Brodersen, Lisa, Ed.D
P.I. Institution Name:Allen College
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:1825 Logan Avenue, Gerard Hall Office 35, Waterloo, IA, 50703, USA
Contact Telephone:319-226-2034
Co-Authors:L.D. Brodersen, Nursing, Allen College, Waterloo, IA;
Purpose: The aim of this phenomenographic study was to describe conceptions of learning and study tactics used by baccalaureate nursing students. This study was part of a quantitative study of BSN students' approaches to studying. Framework: Students are likely to have qualitatively different conceptions of their learning contexts, which may influence the study tactics they choose and their academic success. Subjects: The quantitative sample was comprised of 174 BSN students (94% female) who were completing a semester of Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology, or Nursing Care of the Adult. A purposive sample of 6 high achieving, 4 medium achieving, and 3 failing students participated. Method: Conceptions of learning and study tactics were identified through individual semi-structured interviews lasting 30-45 minutes. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The data were organized in an Execl spreadsheet and subjected to Phenomenographic analysis in order to identify students' conceptions of their learning contexts and the specific study tactics they used within those contexts. Results: Students described varied conceptions of their learning contexts and what they did to prepare for exams. All students described their learning contexts as featuring lecture-style teaching methods and fact-based assessment. The predominant in-class activity was note-taking, conceptions of which were related to whether a note-taking handout was provided, year of study, and academic achievement. Year of study and academic achievement were related to what students did to prepare for exams and the number of study tactics they used, which ranged 1-5, the most frequent being notes review. Conclusions: Students have various conceptions of learning and specific study tactics. There are relationships between students' conceptions of their learning contexts, what they do to learn and prepare for exams, year of study, use of study tactics, and academic achievement. These findings have implications for the identification and counseling of students who are at risk for low academic achievement. Additional research is needed to describe the study tactics students choose and to determine how those tactics relate to academic achievement.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBSN Students' Conceptions of Learning and Study Tacticsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160772-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">BSN Students' Conceptions of Learning and Study Tactics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brodersen, Lisa, Ed.D</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Allen College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1825 Logan Avenue, Gerard Hall Office 35, Waterloo, IA, 50703, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-226-2034</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">broderld@ihs.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.D. Brodersen, Nursing, Allen College, Waterloo, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The aim of this phenomenographic study was to describe conceptions of learning and study tactics used by baccalaureate nursing students. This study was part of a quantitative study of BSN students' approaches to studying. Framework: Students are likely to have qualitatively different conceptions of their learning contexts, which may influence the study tactics they choose and their academic success. Subjects: The quantitative sample was comprised of 174 BSN students (94% female) who were completing a semester of Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology, or Nursing Care of the Adult. A purposive sample of 6 high achieving, 4 medium achieving, and 3 failing students participated. Method: Conceptions of learning and study tactics were identified through individual semi-structured interviews lasting 30-45 minutes. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The data were organized in an Execl spreadsheet and subjected to Phenomenographic analysis in order to identify students' conceptions of their learning contexts and the specific study tactics they used within those contexts. Results: Students described varied conceptions of their learning contexts and what they did to prepare for exams. All students described their learning contexts as featuring lecture-style teaching methods and fact-based assessment. The predominant in-class activity was note-taking, conceptions of which were related to whether a note-taking handout was provided, year of study, and academic achievement. Year of study and academic achievement were related to what students did to prepare for exams and the number of study tactics they used, which ranged 1-5, the most frequent being notes review. Conclusions: Students have various conceptions of learning and specific study tactics. There are relationships between students' conceptions of their learning contexts, what they do to learn and prepare for exams, year of study, use of study tactics, and academic achievement. These findings have implications for the identification and counseling of students who are at risk for low academic achievement. Additional research is needed to describe the study tactics students choose and to determine how those tactics relate to academic achievement.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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