Spiritual Well-Being, Resilience, and Psychological Distress of Family Caregivers for Elders with Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160773
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spiritual Well-Being, Resilience, and Psychological Distress of Family Caregivers for Elders with Dementia
Abstract:
Spiritual Well-Being, Resilience, and Psychological Distress of Family Caregivers for Elders with Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bull, Margaret, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA
Contact Telephone:414-288-3817
Co-Authors:M.J. Bull, Nursing, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI;
Approximately 44.4 million Americans provide unpaid care to elder family members. The negative consequences of caregiving, particularly psychological distress, are well documented. However, not all family caregivers experience psychological distress. Why is it that some family caregivers have negative health outcomes while others remain in good health? The findings from studies with children and adults with chronic illness suggest that resilience and spiritual well-being (SWB) might serve as protective factors against psychological distress. No studies were located that examined SWB and resilience in family caregivers providing care for elders with dementia. The aims of this study were to: 1) explore relationships between SWB, resilience, and psychological distress of family caregivers for elders with dementia, and 2) identify descriptors of SWB and resilience. In this study, resilience was defined as a dynamic process that enables individuals to bounce back despite adversity. SWB encompassed purpose and meaning in life. A cross sectional design, with triangulation of quantitative and qualitative data, was used. Telephone interviews were conducted with 18 family caregivers. The average age of family caregivers was 64 years; approximately 33.3% were African American. The findings indicate that family caregivers who had higher levels of SWB also scored higher on resilience (r=.567, p=.018). However, SWB and resilience were not significantly related to psychological distress. Family caregivers reported diverse spiritual experiences that contributed to their well-being and used a variety of self sustaining strategies. In addition, previous experiences in dealing with difficult situations, love for the person with dementia, and social support enabled the family caregiver to bounce back despite challenging caregiving situations. The insights from these family caregivers' stories can heighten nurses' awareness of strategies that might help other family caregivers providing care for elders with dementia.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpiritual Well-Being, Resilience, and Psychological Distress of Family Caregivers for Elders with Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160773-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Spiritual Well-Being, Resilience, and Psychological Distress of Family Caregivers for Elders with Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bull, Margaret, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-288-3817</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">margaret.bull@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.J. Bull, Nursing, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Approximately 44.4 million Americans provide unpaid care to elder family members. The negative consequences of caregiving, particularly psychological distress, are well documented. However, not all family caregivers experience psychological distress. Why is it that some family caregivers have negative health outcomes while others remain in good health? The findings from studies with children and adults with chronic illness suggest that resilience and spiritual well-being (SWB) might serve as protective factors against psychological distress. No studies were located that examined SWB and resilience in family caregivers providing care for elders with dementia. The aims of this study were to: 1) explore relationships between SWB, resilience, and psychological distress of family caregivers for elders with dementia, and 2) identify descriptors of SWB and resilience. In this study, resilience was defined as a dynamic process that enables individuals to bounce back despite adversity. SWB encompassed purpose and meaning in life. A cross sectional design, with triangulation of quantitative and qualitative data, was used. Telephone interviews were conducted with 18 family caregivers. The average age of family caregivers was 64 years; approximately 33.3% were African American. The findings indicate that family caregivers who had higher levels of SWB also scored higher on resilience (r=.567, p=.018). However, SWB and resilience were not significantly related to psychological distress. Family caregivers reported diverse spiritual experiences that contributed to their well-being and used a variety of self sustaining strategies. In addition, previous experiences in dealing with difficult situations, love for the person with dementia, and social support enabled the family caregiver to bounce back despite challenging caregiving situations. The insights from these family caregivers' stories can heighten nurses' awareness of strategies that might help other family caregivers providing care for elders with dementia.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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