2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160776
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Circadian Suprachiasmatic Gene Expression in Perimenopausal Female C57Bl/J6 Mice
Abstract:
Circadian Suprachiasmatic Gene Expression in Perimenopausal Female C57Bl/J6 Mice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Chaperon, Claudia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:UNMC CON
Contact Address:985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-8928
Co-Authors:C. Chaperon, N. Rasmussen, Community Based Health , UNMC CON, Omaha, NE; P. Lane, W. Langer, D. Kay, A. Sachs, Pediatrics Nephrology, UNMC College of Medicine, Omaha, NE;
Historically, research on sleep and perimenopause has been minimal. Both in humans and in animals, this phenomenon was thought to be too difficult to study because the estrous cycle would mask the results. This is no longer acceptable. Women's health risks escalate during the perimenopausal transition and scientific methods that can demask the influence of variable hormone influences are urgently needed. Demasking in this preliminary study was based on Borbely's two process model of sleep regulation, a circadian process and a homeostatic process. Nine-month-old female C57Bl/J6 mice were acclimated for 2 months in individual housing, eating and drinking ad libitum, under standard 12:12 light/dark cycle. The mice were then randomly assigned to six different temporal groupings (n = 3-4 mice/time point) (0400, 0800, 1200, 1600, 2000, and 2400). Suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), dissected from brains, were analyzed for mRNA expression of Clock, Per1, Per2, and TrkC and alpha-Esr receptors using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Preliminary dark/light results are available on 12 animals, (0400, 1200, 1600, 2400). The greatest mRNA target gene expression occurs at 0400 and the lowest at 1600 hours for Clock, Trk C, and alpha-Esr receptors. The Per1 and Per2 gene expressions were the greatest at 1600 hours and lowest at 0400 hours. Results of additional gene expression time series correlations and estimations of day/night differences in the perimenopausal C57Bl/J6 mice are pending. Ultimately, the results of this study can lead to the understanding of circadian SCN gene expression and prevention of negative health outcomes during the perimenopausal transition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCircadian Suprachiasmatic Gene Expression in Perimenopausal Female C57Bl/J6 Miceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160776-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Circadian Suprachiasmatic Gene Expression in Perimenopausal Female C57Bl/J6 Mice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chaperon, Claudia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UNMC CON</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-8928</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cchapero@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Chaperon, N. Rasmussen, Community Based Health , UNMC CON, Omaha, NE; P. Lane, W. Langer, D. Kay, A. Sachs, Pediatrics Nephrology, UNMC College of Medicine, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Historically, research on sleep and perimenopause has been minimal. Both in humans and in animals, this phenomenon was thought to be too difficult to study because the estrous cycle would mask the results. This is no longer acceptable. Women's health risks escalate during the perimenopausal transition and scientific methods that can demask the influence of variable hormone influences are urgently needed. Demasking in this preliminary study was based on Borbely's two process model of sleep regulation, a circadian process and a homeostatic process. Nine-month-old female C57Bl/J6 mice were acclimated for 2 months in individual housing, eating and drinking ad libitum, under standard 12:12 light/dark cycle. The mice were then randomly assigned to six different temporal groupings (n = 3-4 mice/time point) (0400, 0800, 1200, 1600, 2000, and 2400). Suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), dissected from brains, were analyzed for mRNA expression of Clock, Per1, Per2, and TrkC and alpha-Esr receptors using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Preliminary dark/light results are available on 12 animals, (0400, 1200, 1600, 2400). The greatest mRNA target gene expression occurs at 0400 and the lowest at 1600 hours for Clock, Trk C, and alpha-Esr receptors. The Per1 and Per2 gene expressions were the greatest at 1600 hours and lowest at 0400 hours. Results of additional gene expression time series correlations and estimations of day/night differences in the perimenopausal C57Bl/J6 mice are pending. Ultimately, the results of this study can lead to the understanding of circadian SCN gene expression and prevention of negative health outcomes during the perimenopausal transition.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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