2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160780
Type:
Presentation
Title:
African American Adolescent Boys' Thoughts about Masculinity
Abstract:
African American Adolescent Boys' Thoughts about Masculinity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Dancy, Barbara, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:845 S. Damen, Office 1060, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-9168
Co-Authors:B.L. Dancy, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Purpose. African American adolescent boys are at disproportionate risk for HIV. Williams (2003) proposes that their vulnerability is linked to masculinity. However, little is known about their thoughts of masculinity, specifically how they define an African American man, what they must learn to survive as an African American man, and what they do to get respect. Conceptual Framework: The study was guided by Bandura's social cognitive theory that purposes that behavior is a function of the relationship between the person's thoughts and his environment. Subjects: The study consisted of a purposive sample of 20 boys self-identifying as an African American between 10 and 15 years of age whose parents reported a monthly income below the federal poverty line. Method: A cross-sectional description qualitative research design was conducted with each boy participating in one audiotaped semi-structured individual face-to-face interview and completing a demographic questionnaire for a total participation time of 65 minutes. Analysis consisted of qualitative content analysis and descriptive statistics. Results: Their mean age was 12.65 years and 75% of their parents reported a monthly income of $2,099 or less. Almost 50% defined an African American man as a "strong smart man" who "works hard to get what he needs," and who "tries to keep his hopes up and stay out of trouble." The remaining boys said someone who accepts society's negative definition and doesn't try to learn, but "just slacks off." Fifty percent said to survive they need to learn to "value education," followed by 40% saying they need to learn to stay safe in their communities that threaten their existence daily. To get respect, they have to fight, be well educated, and have a legal job. Conclusion. African American adolescent boys' thoughts will need to be incorporated into HIV risk reduction interventions to reflect their self-definitions and needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAfrican American Adolescent Boys' Thoughts about Masculinityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160780-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">African American Adolescent Boys' Thoughts about Masculinity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dancy, Barbara, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen, Office 1060, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-9168</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bdancy@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.L. Dancy, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose. African American adolescent boys are at disproportionate risk for HIV. Williams (2003) proposes that their vulnerability is linked to masculinity. However, little is known about their thoughts of masculinity, specifically how they define an African American man, what they must learn to survive as an African American man, and what they do to get respect. Conceptual Framework: The study was guided by Bandura's social cognitive theory that purposes that behavior is a function of the relationship between the person's thoughts and his environment. Subjects: The study consisted of a purposive sample of 20 boys self-identifying as an African American between 10 and 15 years of age whose parents reported a monthly income below the federal poverty line. Method: A cross-sectional description qualitative research design was conducted with each boy participating in one audiotaped semi-structured individual face-to-face interview and completing a demographic questionnaire for a total participation time of 65 minutes. Analysis consisted of qualitative content analysis and descriptive statistics. Results: Their mean age was 12.65 years and 75% of their parents reported a monthly income of $2,099 or less. Almost 50% defined an African American man as a &quot;strong smart man&quot; who &quot;works hard to get what he needs,&quot; and who &quot;tries to keep his hopes up and stay out of trouble.&quot; The remaining boys said someone who accepts society's negative definition and doesn't try to learn, but &quot;just slacks off.&quot; Fifty percent said to survive they need to learn to &quot;value education,&quot; followed by 40% saying they need to learn to stay safe in their communities that threaten their existence daily. To get respect, they have to fight, be well educated, and have a legal job. Conclusion. African American adolescent boys' thoughts will need to be incorporated into HIV risk reduction interventions to reflect their self-definitions and needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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