2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160784
Type:
Presentation
Title:
It's called "Going Out to Play": Hmong Girls' Perspectives on Running Away
Abstract:
It's called "Going Out to Play": Hmong Girls' Perspectives on Running Away
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Edinburgh, Laurel, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Hospital and Clinics of Minnesota
Title:Midwest Children's Resource Center
Contact Address:347 North Smith Ave, Suite 401, St. Paul, MN, 55102, USA
Contact Telephone:651-220-6750
Co-Authors:L.D. Edinburgh, Midwest Children's Resource Center, Children's Hospital and Clinics of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN; C. Garcia, Adolescent Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis, MN; E. Saewyc, Nursing, University of British Columbia S
Background: A commonly reported characteristic of teen runaways is that they leave home to escape severe intra-familial conflict or abuse. However, Hmong teen runaways are less likely to report a history of prior family violence than other runaways. What other influences may be affecting these teens' decision to leave home? Gained understanding about context-specific influences could improve health professionals' ability to develop culturally appropriate, effective interventions for Hmong teens and their families. Purpose: To explore Hmong adolescents' reasons for running away from home or remaining away, and their perceptions of harms to their health while on the run. Theoretical Framework: Bronfenbrenner's ecological model facilitates understanding of social influences on Hmong runaway girls' behavior. Methodology: As part of a larger mixed-method, quasi-experimental intervention study, a subset of 8Hmong girls, ages 13 to 15, completed a video diary, reflecting on their experiences in monologue format. Atlas.ti software was used to organize coded video data. Coded data were categorized into descriptive themes representing familial, cultural, and intrapersonal factors that may have contributed to the decision to run away. Results: Rich cultural insights about Hmong girls' runaway experiences were observed in the video data, which organized into 3 categories: 1) life stressors and events before leaving home (e.g., culturally-specific family role expectations that conflict with the dominant culture's teen roles, boredom, and impulsivity); 2) reasons for returning home or for staying away (e.g., enjoyment of "playing" away from home, boyfriend's wishes, and missing family), and 3) recognizing potential health consequences of being on the run (e.g. substance use and violence). Implications: Health care providers addressing runaway behaviors and related health risks for Hmong girls will benefit from learning how these Hmong girls' view their runaway actions, and how concrete and impulsive the girls' are, as revealed in their shared cultural perspectives and experiences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIt's called "Going Out to Play": Hmong Girls' Perspectives on Running Awayen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160784-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">It's called &quot;Going Out to Play&quot;: Hmong Girls' Perspectives on Running Away</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Edinburgh, Laurel, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Hospital and Clinics of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Midwest Children's Resource Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">347 North Smith Ave, Suite 401, St. Paul, MN, 55102, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">651-220-6750</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Laurel.edinburgh@childrensmn.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.D. Edinburgh, Midwest Children's Resource Center, Children's Hospital and Clinics of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN; C. Garcia, Adolescent Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis, MN; E. Saewyc, Nursing, University of British Columbia S</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: A commonly reported characteristic of teen runaways is that they leave home to escape severe intra-familial conflict or abuse. However, Hmong teen runaways are less likely to report a history of prior family violence than other runaways. What other influences may be affecting these teens' decision to leave home? Gained understanding about context-specific influences could improve health professionals' ability to develop culturally appropriate, effective interventions for Hmong teens and their families. Purpose: To explore Hmong adolescents' reasons for running away from home or remaining away, and their perceptions of harms to their health while on the run. Theoretical Framework: Bronfenbrenner's ecological model facilitates understanding of social influences on Hmong runaway girls' behavior. Methodology: As part of a larger mixed-method, quasi-experimental intervention study, a subset of 8Hmong girls, ages 13 to 15, completed a video diary, reflecting on their experiences in monologue format. Atlas.ti software was used to organize coded video data. Coded data were categorized into descriptive themes representing familial, cultural, and intrapersonal factors that may have contributed to the decision to run away. Results: Rich cultural insights about Hmong girls' runaway experiences were observed in the video data, which organized into 3 categories: 1) life stressors and events before leaving home (e.g., culturally-specific family role expectations that conflict with the dominant culture's teen roles, boredom, and impulsivity); 2) reasons for returning home or for staying away (e.g., enjoyment of &quot;playing&quot; away from home, boyfriend's wishes, and missing family), and 3) recognizing potential health consequences of being on the run (e.g. substance use and violence). Implications: Health care providers addressing runaway behaviors and related health risks for Hmong girls will benefit from learning how these Hmong girls' view their runaway actions, and how concrete and impulsive the girls' are, as revealed in their shared cultural perspectives and experiences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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