Effective Nursing Care in Cases of Domestic Violence: Listening and Learning from the Voices of Victims

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160785
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effective Nursing Care in Cases of Domestic Violence: Listening and Learning from the Voices of Victims
Abstract:
Effective Nursing Care in Cases of Domestic Violence: Listening and Learning from the Voices of Victims
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Evanson, Tracy, PhD, PHCNS-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:430 Oxford St. Stop 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA
Contact Telephone:701-777-4559
Co-Authors:T.A. Evanson, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND;
Domestic violence (DV) is considered to be a public health epidemic, resulting in a multitude of health consequences. Nurses encounter victims of DV in all health care settings, yet nurses repeatedly report feeling inadequately prepared to deal with DV when it occurs in their client population. Further, little is known about what victims perceive as effective or ineffective nursing care. Aims: The purpose of this descriptive phenomenological study was to elicit the experiences of victims of DV who had maternal-child health nurses visiting them in their homes, in order to describe the victims' perspectives about: 1) their relationship with the nurse, 2) things the nurse did that were helpful, given the DV situation, 3) things the nurse did that were not helpful, and 4) how they define "measures of success" for nurses working with families where DV is occurring. Methods: Interviews were conducted with seven women who had a maternal-child health nurse visiting them in their home for at least 4 months during the time they were in an abusive relationship. Analysis was conducted using a descriptive phenomenology framework. Results: Findings revealed that the essence of the phenomenon, from the victims' perspective, was that the nurse "was more like a friend." This was manifested through several themes: "She listened and was nonjudgmental;" "She told me I deserved better;" "She pointed out all the positive things I was doing"; "She got me connected to the help I needed;" "I could count on her;" "She shared things about herself;" and "She went over and beyond." Conclusion: Victims of DV perceived the nurses as a positive source of support. While the practice of these nurses occurred in the home-setting, the supportive behaviors are transferable to nurses in any setting. Nurses can provide positive victim support and DV intervention by adopting the strategies described.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffective Nursing Care in Cases of Domestic Violence: Listening and Learning from the Voices of Victimsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160785-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effective Nursing Care in Cases of Domestic Violence: Listening and Learning from the Voices of Victims</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Evanson, Tracy, PhD, PHCNS-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">430 Oxford St. Stop 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">701-777-4559</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tracyevanson@mail.und.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T.A. Evanson, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Domestic violence (DV) is considered to be a public health epidemic, resulting in a multitude of health consequences. Nurses encounter victims of DV in all health care settings, yet nurses repeatedly report feeling inadequately prepared to deal with DV when it occurs in their client population. Further, little is known about what victims perceive as effective or ineffective nursing care. Aims: The purpose of this descriptive phenomenological study was to elicit the experiences of victims of DV who had maternal-child health nurses visiting them in their homes, in order to describe the victims' perspectives about: 1) their relationship with the nurse, 2) things the nurse did that were helpful, given the DV situation, 3) things the nurse did that were not helpful, and 4) how they define &quot;measures of success&quot; for nurses working with families where DV is occurring. Methods: Interviews were conducted with seven women who had a maternal-child health nurse visiting them in their home for at least 4 months during the time they were in an abusive relationship. Analysis was conducted using a descriptive phenomenology framework. Results: Findings revealed that the essence of the phenomenon, from the victims' perspective, was that the nurse &quot;was more like a friend.&quot; This was manifested through several themes: &quot;She listened and was nonjudgmental;&quot; &quot;She told me I deserved better;&quot; &quot;She pointed out all the positive things I was doing&quot;; &quot;She got me connected to the help I needed;&quot; &quot;I could count on her;&quot; &quot;She shared things about herself;&quot; and &quot;She went over and beyond.&quot; Conclusion: Victims of DV perceived the nurses as a positive source of support. While the practice of these nurses occurred in the home-setting, the supportive behaviors are transferable to nurses in any setting. Nurses can provide positive victim support and DV intervention by adopting the strategies described.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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