2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160786
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Distrust of Health Care Providers in Cancer Screening of African Americans
Abstract:
Distrust of Health Care Providers in Cancer Screening of African Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ferrans, Carol, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-8445
Co-Authors:C.E. Ferrans, C. Ryan, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; S. Freels, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; R. Molokie, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Purpose: To decrease excess cancer mortality in African Americans, we need to identify the barriers to early detection. For cancer survivors who are at increased risk for recurrence and new cancers, continued surveillance is critically important. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that hinder regular cancer screening in African Americans, both in cancer survivors and the general population (non-cancer controls). Methods: For this descriptive, case-control study of African Americans (500 cancer survivors, 512 non-cancer controls), the survivor group included breast (n=214), prostate (n=197), and colon cancer (n=89) survivors from 16 institutions throughout the country. Non-cancer controls were selected via random digit dialing and were matched as a group to the survivors, so the two groups were similar in ethnicity, gender, education, and city of residence. Guided by Kornblith's adaptation model for cancer survivors, the contribution of the variables to screening was evaluated with multiple regression modeling. Results: Significantly more non-cancer controls than survivors failed to screen according to American Cancer Society guidelines (p = .0005, unadjusted). For controls, 37% to 58% were outside of guidelines for breast, colon, and prostate cancer, as compared to 14% to 17% of survivors. In addition to never having cancer, the factors contributing to less frequent screening were male gender, less trust in health care providers, lack of health insurance, lower education, and city of residence (p<.01). The strongest predictors were gender and distrust of providers (p< .0001), which had a more powerful influence on non-compliance than 15 other variables. Conclusion: Trust in health care providers was one of the strongest factors associated with screening for both African American cancer survivors and those who never had cancer. Since trust can be directly influenced in clinical practice, these findings suggest future work to facilitate the development of trust, particularly for African American men.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDistrust of Health Care Providers in Cancer Screening of African Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160786-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Distrust of Health Care Providers in Cancer Screening of African Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ferrans, Carol, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-8445</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cferrans@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.E. Ferrans, C. Ryan, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; S. Freels, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; R. Molokie, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To decrease excess cancer mortality in African Americans, we need to identify the barriers to early detection. For cancer survivors who are at increased risk for recurrence and new cancers, continued surveillance is critically important. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that hinder regular cancer screening in African Americans, both in cancer survivors and the general population (non-cancer controls). Methods: For this descriptive, case-control study of African Americans (500 cancer survivors, 512 non-cancer controls), the survivor group included breast (n=214), prostate (n=197), and colon cancer (n=89) survivors from 16 institutions throughout the country. Non-cancer controls were selected via random digit dialing and were matched as a group to the survivors, so the two groups were similar in ethnicity, gender, education, and city of residence. Guided by Kornblith's adaptation model for cancer survivors, the contribution of the variables to screening was evaluated with multiple regression modeling. Results: Significantly more non-cancer controls than survivors failed to screen according to American Cancer Society guidelines (p = .0005, unadjusted). For controls, 37% to 58% were outside of guidelines for breast, colon, and prostate cancer, as compared to 14% to 17% of survivors. In addition to never having cancer, the factors contributing to less frequent screening were male gender, less trust in health care providers, lack of health insurance, lower education, and city of residence (p&lt;.01). The strongest predictors were gender and distrust of providers (p&lt; .0001), which had a more powerful influence on non-compliance than 15 other variables. Conclusion: Trust in health care providers was one of the strongest factors associated with screening for both African American cancer survivors and those who never had cancer. Since trust can be directly influenced in clinical practice, these findings suggest future work to facilitate the development of trust, particularly for African American men.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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