2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160788
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parent-Provider Communication in the Complex Care Environment
Abstract:
Parent-Provider Communication in the Complex Care Environment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Fisher, Mark, MS
P.I. Institution Name:OUHSC College of Nursing
Title:Academic Programs
Contact Address:1100 North Stonewall Avenue, #433, Oklahoma City, OK, 73117, USA
Contact Telephone:405/250-3385
Co-Authors:M.J. Fisher, College of Nursing, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK;
Complexities of health care today create challenges for patients, their families and health care providers. Constants in all health care are interactions and communication between patients and their care providers. Pediatric health care often creates another layer of complexity with parents and family members often involved in care delivery and decision making. Although it was introduced over two decades ago, family/patient-centered care has yet to be fully embraced as the model of care. Effective communication between parents, nurses, and physicians is an essential component of family-centered pediatric health care. Outcomes including safety, quality of care and patient/parent satisfaction generate the need to investigate and more thoroughly understand how and why parents, nurses, and physicians communicate in today's complex health care environment. Through careful examination and evaluation of the triadic (parent-nurse-physician) communication process, currently effective means of interaction and potential insights aimed at improving inpatient pediatric care could be discovered. Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to explore and describe parent, nurse, and doctor communication, individually, collectively as health care teams and as members of a unit. Method: Limited research involving the parent-nurse-physician triad led to the use of a qualitative approach using face-to-face interviews. Setting: Interviews were conducted on a pediatric inpatient hematology-oncology unit in a large rural children's hospital. Findings: Themes emerging from analysis include: parents know their child, knowing the nurse or doctor is valued by parents, listening is important, and current systems do not allow ideal communication to exist. Conclusion: Safe and high quality pediatric health care is clearly more than the sum of the parts. Gaining a deeper understanding of the interactions and communication between parents, nurses, and physicians as collective health care teams could lead to innovative methods of care and more satisfied patients, parents, and providers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParent-Provider Communication in the Complex Care Environmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160788-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parent-Provider Communication in the Complex Care Environment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fisher, Mark, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">OUHSC College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Academic Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1100 North Stonewall Avenue, #433, Oklahoma City, OK, 73117, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">405/250-3385</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mark-fisher@ouhsc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.J. Fisher, College of Nursing, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Complexities of health care today create challenges for patients, their families and health care providers. Constants in all health care are interactions and communication between patients and their care providers. Pediatric health care often creates another layer of complexity with parents and family members often involved in care delivery and decision making. Although it was introduced over two decades ago, family/patient-centered care has yet to be fully embraced as the model of care. Effective communication between parents, nurses, and physicians is an essential component of family-centered pediatric health care. Outcomes including safety, quality of care and patient/parent satisfaction generate the need to investigate and more thoroughly understand how and why parents, nurses, and physicians communicate in today's complex health care environment. Through careful examination and evaluation of the triadic (parent-nurse-physician) communication process, currently effective means of interaction and potential insights aimed at improving inpatient pediatric care could be discovered. Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to explore and describe parent, nurse, and doctor communication, individually, collectively as health care teams and as members of a unit. Method: Limited research involving the parent-nurse-physician triad led to the use of a qualitative approach using face-to-face interviews. Setting: Interviews were conducted on a pediatric inpatient hematology-oncology unit in a large rural children's hospital. Findings: Themes emerging from analysis include: parents know their child, knowing the nurse or doctor is valued by parents, listening is important, and current systems do not allow ideal communication to exist. Conclusion: Safe and high quality pediatric health care is clearly more than the sum of the parts. Gaining a deeper understanding of the interactions and communication between parents, nurses, and physicians as collective health care teams could lead to innovative methods of care and more satisfied patients, parents, and providers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.