Ethical practices in human resource management in health care settings: A case study of an employee suicide incident following termination

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160791
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethical practices in human resource management in health care settings: A case study of an employee suicide incident following termination
Abstract:
Ethical practices in human resource management in health care settings: A case study of an employee suicide incident following termination
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Green, Catherine, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:1509 Pine Valley Blvd, 10, Ann Arbor, MI, 48104, USA
Contact Telephone:734 883-2635
Co-Authors:C.A. Green, H. Tzeng, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; C. Yin, Department of History, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, TAIWAN;
This paper, as a case study, describes and analyzes an employee suicide incident (an occupational therapist), which occurred following a verbal notice of job termination from her immediate supervisor. This incident occurred in the home care and hospice program of a small rural hospital in the United States. The analyses focus on ethical practices in human resource management from the perspectives of hospital and nursing leaders. Employee suicide obviously has great impact on the remaining employees and administration. We discuss the strategies this hospital adopted (e.g., offering community meetings and support) to help employees work through the grief process and bring homeostasis back to the work setting. This paper also analyzes this hospital's process in dealing with the impact of an employee suicide and how an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) was used prior to and after this suicide incidence. We also discuss issues related to the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and the impact it has on the institutions, especially on the decision making of hospital and nursing leaders as related to human resource management (e.g., disciplinary action and termination). Over half of human resource professionals have had significant challenges in implementing the provisions of FMLA. Successfully navigating this provision and having proper policies in place are crucial. Studies have shown the importance of EAP services for employees with depression and suicidal thoughts. Offering EAP services to employees may make a difference in coping with their personal and job-related stresses as well as their productivity at work.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthical practices in human resource management in health care settings: A case study of an employee suicide incident following terminationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160791-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ethical practices in human resource management in health care settings: A case study of an employee suicide incident following termination</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Green, Catherine, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1509 Pine Valley Blvd, 10, Ann Arbor, MI, 48104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734 883-2635</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">catigree@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.A. Green, H. Tzeng, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; C. Yin, Department of History, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, TAIWAN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract"> This paper, as a case study, describes and analyzes an employee suicide incident (an occupational therapist), which occurred following a verbal notice of job termination from her immediate supervisor. This incident occurred in the home care and hospice program of a small rural hospital in the United States. The analyses focus on ethical practices in human resource management from the perspectives of hospital and nursing leaders. Employee suicide obviously has great impact on the remaining employees and administration. We discuss the strategies this hospital adopted (e.g., offering community meetings and support) to help employees work through the grief process and bring homeostasis back to the work setting. This paper also analyzes this hospital's process in dealing with the impact of an employee suicide and how an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) was used prior to and after this suicide incidence. We also discuss issues related to the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and the impact it has on the institutions, especially on the decision making of hospital and nursing leaders as related to human resource management (e.g., disciplinary action and termination). Over half of human resource professionals have had significant challenges in implementing the provisions of FMLA. Successfully navigating this provision and having proper policies in place are crucial. Studies have shown the importance of EAP services for employees with depression and suicidal thoughts. Offering EAP services to employees may make a difference in coping with their personal and job-related stresses as well as their productivity at work.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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