"My Toddler Won't Eat Her Veggies": Mothers' Self-Efficacy, "Picky Eaters" and Toddler Feeding Practices in Low-Income African American and Non-Hispanic/White Mothers.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160793
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"My Toddler Won't Eat Her Veggies": Mothers' Self-Efficacy, "Picky Eaters" and Toddler Feeding Practices in Low-Income African American and Non-Hispanic/White Mothers.
Abstract:
"My Toddler Won't Eat Her Veggies": Mothers' Self-Efficacy, "Picky Eaters" and Toddler Feeding Practices in Low-Income African American and Non-Hispanic/White Mothers.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Horodynski, Mildred, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:B 515 G West Fee Hall, Nursing Research Center, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:517-355-8360
Co-Authors:M.A. Horodynski, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; H.E. Brophy-Herb, C.G. Chen, Family and Child Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; L. Weatherspoon, Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State Univers
Purpose/Conceptual Framework: Childhood obesity is a significant public health problem in the U.S, and risks for obesity begin early. Mothers influence dietary behaviors of their toddlers through the types and amounts of foods offered, modeling of eating behaviors, and feeding practices. Mothers' own food choices, feeding self-efficacy and perceptions of a "picky eater" can interfere with feeding practices. The purposes of this study were to examine, in the context of maternal race, whether: 1) maternal feeding self-efficacy and food choices influenced mothers' perceptions of toddlers as "picky eaters," and 2) mothers' perceptions of toddlers as "picky eaters" and their own food choices predicted toddlers' healthy food consumption. The Social Cognitive Theory guided the study. Subjects/Method: A prospective, cross-sectional survey design was employed with 199 African American (AA) and 200 Non-Hispanic/White low-income mother-toddler dyads enrolled in eight Early Head Start programs in a Midwestern state. Mothers completed the Feeding Self-Efficacy Scale, Mothers' and Toddlers' Food Frequency Questionnaires, and Personal Information Form. "Healthy food consumption" was defined as fruits, vegetables, unsweetened cereals, and water. Data were analyzed with two-stage multiple regression analysis. Results: Mothers' mean age was 27 years; toddlers, 25 months. Most mothers were single, not employed outside the home, with a high school education. Forty-five percent of toddlers were "at-risk for overweight" or "overweight." AA families consumed less fruits, vegetables, and unsweetened cereals than White families. AA mothers and mothers with lower feeding self-efficacy were more likely to perceive their toddlers as "picky eaters." Mothers with lower feeding self-efficacy, consumed less healthy foods, and who perceived their toddlers as picky eaters were less likely to feed their toddlers healthy foods. Conclusions: Nurses need to work with mothers to increase their feeding self-efficacy and to reinforce healthy food choices and mealtime management when toddlers refuse to eat fruits and vegetables.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"My Toddler Won't Eat Her Veggies": Mothers' Self-Efficacy, "Picky Eaters" and Toddler Feeding Practices in Low-Income African American and Non-Hispanic/White Mothers.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160793-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">&quot;My Toddler Won't Eat Her Veggies&quot;: Mothers' Self-Efficacy, &quot;Picky Eaters&quot; and Toddler Feeding Practices in Low-Income African American and Non-Hispanic/White Mothers.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Horodynski, Mildred, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">B 515 G West Fee Hall, Nursing Research Center, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517-355-8360</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">millie@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.A. Horodynski, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; H.E. Brophy-Herb, C.G. Chen, Family and Child Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; L. Weatherspoon, Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State Univers</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Conceptual Framework: Childhood obesity is a significant public health problem in the U.S, and risks for obesity begin early. Mothers influence dietary behaviors of their toddlers through the types and amounts of foods offered, modeling of eating behaviors, and feeding practices. Mothers' own food choices, feeding self-efficacy and perceptions of a &quot;picky eater&quot; can interfere with feeding practices. The purposes of this study were to examine, in the context of maternal race, whether: 1) maternal feeding self-efficacy and food choices influenced mothers' perceptions of toddlers as &quot;picky eaters,&quot; and 2) mothers' perceptions of toddlers as &quot;picky eaters&quot; and their own food choices predicted toddlers' healthy food consumption. The Social Cognitive Theory guided the study. Subjects/Method: A prospective, cross-sectional survey design was employed with 199 African American (AA) and 200 Non-Hispanic/White low-income mother-toddler dyads enrolled in eight Early Head Start programs in a Midwestern state. Mothers completed the Feeding Self-Efficacy Scale, Mothers' and Toddlers' Food Frequency Questionnaires, and Personal Information Form. &quot;Healthy food consumption&quot; was defined as fruits, vegetables, unsweetened cereals, and water. Data were analyzed with two-stage multiple regression analysis. Results: Mothers' mean age was 27 years; toddlers, 25 months. Most mothers were single, not employed outside the home, with a high school education. Forty-five percent of toddlers were &quot;at-risk for overweight&quot; or &quot;overweight.&quot; AA families consumed less fruits, vegetables, and unsweetened cereals than White families. AA mothers and mothers with lower feeding self-efficacy were more likely to perceive their toddlers as &quot;picky eaters.&quot; Mothers with lower feeding self-efficacy, consumed less healthy foods, and who perceived their toddlers as picky eaters were less likely to feed their toddlers healthy foods. Conclusions: Nurses need to work with mothers to increase their feeding self-efficacy and to reinforce healthy food choices and mealtime management when toddlers refuse to eat fruits and vegetables.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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