2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160794
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Menstrual Cycle Self-Care Practices and Patterns of Thai Working Women
Abstract:
Menstrual Cycle Self-Care Practices and Patterns of Thai Working Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Huddleston, Donna, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:Stone & CO, llc
Contact Address:2659 Freedom Parkway, #281, Cumming, GA, 30041, USA
Contact Telephone:770 5190065
Co-Authors:D. Huddleston, Stone & CO, llc, Cumming, GA; P. Chaiphibalsarisdi, , Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, THAILAND; B.J. McElmurry, C.G. Park, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Do Thai working women still use traditional self-care practices for menstrual cycle events and experiences and for discomfort? In Thailand, 530 working women participated in a study exploring the relationship of self-reported menstrual cycle events and experiences, self care practices, and discomfort. Data were collected using the Menstrual Health Measurement (MHM) questionnaire. The women participants randomly selected from the personnel roster of a large factory in an urban area of Thailand ranged in ages 12-47 who had menstruated within the last month. All had completed mandatory sixth grade education. Informed consent was obtained. Analysis of data using SPSS 15 indicated cycle length was 27.8 days with mean flow duration of 4.16 days. These working women continued the traditional self care protocols, including drinking warm water to promote menstrual health. The three groups identified in latent cluster analysis differed significantly in menstrual cycle patterns based on income, children, and oral contraceptive use and modulated with self care and discomfort. Discomfort (F=7.44, df=2, p=0.007) and the premenstrual self-care scores showed a marked difference among the three groups (F=5.93, df=2, p=0.003). Backache was the major discomfort during the premenstrual days and menstrual cramping was the major discomfort during the menstrual days. This study supported the hypothesis that self care practices modulate with menstrual cycle patterns and with discomfort. Also, traditional self-care practices are relevant to nursing assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation as many Thai women continue traditional self-care practices handed down from generation to generation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMenstrual Cycle Self-Care Practices and Patterns of Thai Working Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160794-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Menstrual Cycle Self-Care Practices and Patterns of Thai Working Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huddleston, Donna, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Stone &amp; CO, llc</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2659 Freedom Parkway, #281, Cumming, GA, 30041, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">770 5190065</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dhuddleston1@msn.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D. Huddleston, Stone &amp; CO, llc, Cumming, GA; P. Chaiphibalsarisdi, , Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, THAILAND; B.J. McElmurry, C.G. Park, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Do Thai working women still use traditional self-care practices for menstrual cycle events and experiences and for discomfort? In Thailand, 530 working women participated in a study exploring the relationship of self-reported menstrual cycle events and experiences, self care practices, and discomfort. Data were collected using the Menstrual Health Measurement (MHM) questionnaire. The women participants randomly selected from the personnel roster of a large factory in an urban area of Thailand ranged in ages 12-47 who had menstruated within the last month. All had completed mandatory sixth grade education. Informed consent was obtained. Analysis of data using SPSS 15 indicated cycle length was 27.8 days with mean flow duration of 4.16 days. These working women continued the traditional self care protocols, including drinking warm water to promote menstrual health. The three groups identified in latent cluster analysis differed significantly in menstrual cycle patterns based on income, children, and oral contraceptive use and modulated with self care and discomfort. Discomfort (F=7.44, df=2, p=0.007) and the premenstrual self-care scores showed a marked difference among the three groups (F=5.93, df=2, p=0.003). Backache was the major discomfort during the premenstrual days and menstrual cramping was the major discomfort during the menstrual days. This study supported the hypothesis that self care practices modulate with menstrual cycle patterns and with discomfort. Also, traditional self-care practices are relevant to nursing assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation as many Thai women continue traditional self-care practices handed down from generation to generation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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