2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160802
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Stroke Caregiver Depression in The First Months Caregiving at Home
Abstract:
Predictors of Stroke Caregiver Depression in The First Months Caregiving at Home
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:KIng, Rosemarie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Title:Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Contact Address:Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, 345 E. Superior St., Room 1406, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA
Contact Telephone:312-908-8038
Co-Authors:R.B. King, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; R.J. Hartke, Psychology, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Introduction. Caregivers of stroke survivors assume their role suddenly and with little preparation to care for a loved one. Depressive symptoms are common and persist over time. The purpose of this study, guided by a stress and coping model, was to identify predictors of caregiver depression during the first six months caregiving. We hypothesized that coping variables would be significant predictors of depression. Methods. Caregivers (N=123) completed an assessment during the survivor's acute rehabilitation (T1) and three months (T2) and six months (T3) post-discharge. Data were collected on depression, caregiver demographics and physical health, survivor illness, and caregiver coping variables (appraisal, problem-solving skills [PS], and unmet resource needs [URN]). The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to measure depressive symptoms. Variables that were correlated significantly (p <.05) with depression at T2 and T3 were entered into the respective hierarchical regression analyses. Results. After adjusting for health and the adequacy of rest; health (p <.05), threat appraisal and negative problem orientation (PO) were significant (p < .01) in the final step of the T2 model (R² = .47). Positive PO, avoidance PS, benign and benefit appraisals, and URN were non-significant. Survivor illness variables were not eligible for entry. In the model predicting T3 depressive symptoms (R² = .61), survivor function, threat appraisal, and negative PO were significant (p <.01) after controlling for health and rest. The other variables entered in the analysis (positive PO, benign and benefit appraisals, and URN) were not significant in the final model. Relationships were such that poorer survivor function and greater negative PO and threat appraisal were related to greater depressive symptoms. Conclusion. Threat appraisal and negative PO are consistent predictors of depression. However, caregiver health and survivor function were significant at either T2 or T3. The findings highlight the need for early interventions to promote effective coping.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Stroke Caregiver Depression in The First Months Caregiving at Homeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160802-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Stroke Caregiver Depression in The First Months Caregiving at Home</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">KIng, Rosemarie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Physical Medicine &amp; Rehabilitation</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, 345 E. Superior St., Room 1406, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-908-8038</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rbking@northwestern.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R.B. King, Physical Medicine &amp; Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; R.J. Hartke, Psychology, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction. Caregivers of stroke survivors assume their role suddenly and with little preparation to care for a loved one. Depressive symptoms are common and persist over time. The purpose of this study, guided by a stress and coping model, was to identify predictors of caregiver depression during the first six months caregiving. We hypothesized that coping variables would be significant predictors of depression. Methods. Caregivers (N=123) completed an assessment during the survivor's acute rehabilitation (T1) and three months (T2) and six months (T3) post-discharge. Data were collected on depression, caregiver demographics and physical health, survivor illness, and caregiver coping variables (appraisal, problem-solving skills [PS], and unmet resource needs [URN]). The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to measure depressive symptoms. Variables that were correlated significantly (p &lt;.05) with depression at T2 and T3 were entered into the respective hierarchical regression analyses. Results. After adjusting for health and the adequacy of rest; health (p &lt;.05), threat appraisal and negative problem orientation (PO) were significant (p &lt; .01) in the final step of the T2 model (R&sup2; = .47). Positive PO, avoidance PS, benign and benefit appraisals, and URN were non-significant. Survivor illness variables were not eligible for entry. In the model predicting T3 depressive symptoms (R&sup2; = .61), survivor function, threat appraisal, and negative PO were significant (p &lt;.01) after controlling for health and rest. The other variables entered in the analysis (positive PO, benign and benefit appraisals, and URN) were not significant in the final model. Relationships were such that poorer survivor function and greater negative PO and threat appraisal were related to greater depressive symptoms. Conclusion. Threat appraisal and negative PO are consistent predictors of depression. However, caregiver health and survivor function were significant at either T2 or T3. The findings highlight the need for early interventions to promote effective coping.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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