2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160806
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Self-Report Instrument to Measure The Unpleasant Symptoms of Urogenital Atrophy
Abstract:
A Self-Report Instrument to Measure The Unpleasant Symptoms of Urogenital Atrophy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Lester, Joanne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The Ohio State University
Title:James Cancer Hospital / College of Nursing
Contact Address:1142 Holton Road, Grove City, OH, 43123, USA
Contact Telephone:614-519-8995
Co-Authors:J. Lester, Nursing, James Cancer Hospital , College of Nursing, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH;
Nearly 2.3 million women in the United States are alive with breast cancer. Breast cancer mortality rates continue to improve, allowing the vast majority of women to survive their breast cancer experience with a near normal life expectancy, or extended years of life before recurrence (Jemal, et al., 2008). Despite this improved quantity of life, side effects from breast cancer treatment can decrease quality of life. Unpleasant symptoms such as urogenital atrophy can be experienced secondary to consequences of diagnosis and the life-extending treatments of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, hormone agonists, and ovarian ablation (Santoro, 2005; Woods & Mitchell, 2005). Urogenital atrophy negatively affects the lower urinary and genital tracts, as well as the physical and psychological aspects of sexuality. The theory of unpleasant symptoms (Lenz & Pugh, 2003) provides a theoretical framework to study self-reported symptoms of urogenital atrophy in breast cancer survivors, as well as the physiologic, situational, and psychologic influences of breast cancer treatment on these symptoms, and the resulting effects on performance. In 2007, breast cancer survivors (N=198) and women without breast cancer (N=166) were invited to test a urogenital instrument that was created to assess the subjective symptoms of urogenital atrophy. The urogenital instrument consisted of 45 items that included factors of pain/discomfort, function, satisfaction, and quality of life from the urinary, genital, and sexual domains of urogenital atrophy. Using factor analysis, ten factors were identified in the study that described symptoms related to urogenital atrophy. A new instrument was formed that allowed women, regardless of sexual orientation, level of sexual activity, partner status, practice of penile intercourse, and/or breast cancer treatment(s) to describe their experienced symptoms of urogenital atrophy (Lester, 2008). This new instrument fills a gap in the literature with empirical data verifying the prevalence of the unpleasant symptoms related to urogenital atrophy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Self-Report Instrument to Measure The Unpleasant Symptoms of Urogenital Atrophyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160806-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Self-Report Instrument to Measure The Unpleasant Symptoms of Urogenital Atrophy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lester, Joanne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">James Cancer Hospital / College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1142 Holton Road, Grove City, OH, 43123, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614-519-8995</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joanne.lester@osumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Lester, Nursing, James Cancer Hospital , College of Nursing, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nearly 2.3 million women in the United States are alive with breast cancer. Breast cancer mortality rates continue to improve, allowing the vast majority of women to survive their breast cancer experience with a near normal life expectancy, or extended years of life before recurrence (Jemal, et al., 2008). Despite this improved quantity of life, side effects from breast cancer treatment can decrease quality of life. Unpleasant symptoms such as urogenital atrophy can be experienced secondary to consequences of diagnosis and the life-extending treatments of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, hormone agonists, and ovarian ablation (Santoro, 2005; Woods &amp; Mitchell, 2005). Urogenital atrophy negatively affects the lower urinary and genital tracts, as well as the physical and psychological aspects of sexuality. The theory of unpleasant symptoms (Lenz &amp; Pugh, 2003) provides a theoretical framework to study self-reported symptoms of urogenital atrophy in breast cancer survivors, as well as the physiologic, situational, and psychologic influences of breast cancer treatment on these symptoms, and the resulting effects on performance. In 2007, breast cancer survivors (N=198) and women without breast cancer (N=166) were invited to test a urogenital instrument that was created to assess the subjective symptoms of urogenital atrophy. The urogenital instrument consisted of 45 items that included factors of pain/discomfort, function, satisfaction, and quality of life from the urinary, genital, and sexual domains of urogenital atrophy. Using factor analysis, ten factors were identified in the study that described symptoms related to urogenital atrophy. A new instrument was formed that allowed women, regardless of sexual orientation, level of sexual activity, partner status, practice of penile intercourse, and/or breast cancer treatment(s) to describe their experienced symptoms of urogenital atrophy (Lester, 2008). This new instrument fills a gap in the literature with empirical data verifying the prevalence of the unpleasant symptoms related to urogenital atrophy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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