Time-Motion Study of Role and Work-Related Processes of Research Nurses in a Study of Home Monitoring after Lung Transplantation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160807
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Time-Motion Study of Role and Work-Related Processes of Research Nurses in a Study of Home Monitoring after Lung Transplantation
Abstract:
Time-Motion Study of Role and Work-Related Processes of Research Nurses in a Study of Home Monitoring after Lung Transplantation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Lindquist, Ruth, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-140 WDH, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-624-5646
Co-Authors:R. Lindquist, A. Van Wormer, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; K. Harrington, S. Finkelstein, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; B. Lindgren, Biostatistics and Informatics
Background: Emergence and integration of new technologies precipitate changes in roles and work lives of nurses. Nurses' work with home monitoring technologies in a spirometry-based program transmitting pulmonary function data following lung transplantation is dissimilar from direct patient care. However, the nature of nurses' changing role in such a program has not been well-described. Time-motion studies may identify nurses' time and effort on work-related tasks that can be used to better understand the nature of the role and improve efficiency. Purpose: This paper describes a time-motion study of two research nurses in context of a home-spirometry study monitoring patients' pulmonary status following lung transplantation. Methods: 65 project/study-related activities of the research nurses were identified and included on an observation recording sheet in 10 categories; these were validated by 3 nurse researchers in pilot observations. Two weeks (10 working days) of observations with a digital timer were made by one nurse observer; 50 paired observations were made by a second observer to establish observer reliability. Findings: 610 tasks for 45 patients were recorded over 48.8 hours of observation; task time ranged from mere seconds (e.g., data review) to 39 minutes (clinic visit). Between-observer interclass correlation reflecting agreement for duration of activities was .944; agreement for category of activity was good (Kappa=0.82); percent agreement=96%. Computer tasks were the most frequent (average=118 tasks/week) and most time-intensive, along with face-to-face interaction of nurses with health professionals (both averaged 267 minutes/week). Data review tasks were next most frequent (49/week), but not time-intensive (average=47 minutes/week). Conclusions/Recommendations: Findings reveal patterns of effort and time expenditure associated with evolving roles in home monitoring of health status of patients with chronic conditions. A second time-motion study is planned to determine work distribution changes as the role of these nurses evolves. Acknowledgement: Supported by NINR R01 NR009212
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTime-Motion Study of Role and Work-Related Processes of Research Nurses in a Study of Home Monitoring after Lung Transplantationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160807-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Time-Motion Study of Role and Work-Related Processes of Research Nurses in a Study of Home Monitoring after Lung Transplantation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lindquist, Ruth, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-140 WDH, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-624-5646</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lindq002@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Lindquist, A. Van Wormer, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; K. Harrington, S. Finkelstein, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; B. Lindgren, Biostatistics and Informatics </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Emergence and integration of new technologies precipitate changes in roles and work lives of nurses. Nurses' work with home monitoring technologies in a spirometry-based program transmitting pulmonary function data following lung transplantation is dissimilar from direct patient care. However, the nature of nurses' changing role in such a program has not been well-described. Time-motion studies may identify nurses' time and effort on work-related tasks that can be used to better understand the nature of the role and improve efficiency. Purpose: This paper describes a time-motion study of two research nurses in context of a home-spirometry study monitoring patients' pulmonary status following lung transplantation. Methods: 65 project/study-related activities of the research nurses were identified and included on an observation recording sheet in 10 categories; these were validated by 3 nurse researchers in pilot observations. Two weeks (10 working days) of observations with a digital timer were made by one nurse observer; 50 paired observations were made by a second observer to establish observer reliability. Findings: 610 tasks for 45 patients were recorded over 48.8 hours of observation; task time ranged from mere seconds (e.g., data review) to 39 minutes (clinic visit). Between-observer interclass correlation reflecting agreement for duration of activities was .944; agreement for category of activity was good (Kappa=0.82); percent agreement=96%. Computer tasks were the most frequent (average=118 tasks/week) and most time-intensive, along with face-to-face interaction of nurses with health professionals (both averaged 267 minutes/week). Data review tasks were next most frequent (49/week), but not time-intensive (average=47 minutes/week). Conclusions/Recommendations: Findings reveal patterns of effort and time expenditure associated with evolving roles in home monitoring of health status of patients with chronic conditions. A second time-motion study is planned to determine work distribution changes as the role of these nurses evolves. Acknowledgement: Supported by NINR R01 NR009212</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:10:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:10:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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