Cross-Cultural Equivalence of the Arabic Social Capital Scale for Families of Children with Chronic Health Conditions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160808
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cross-Cultural Equivalence of the Arabic Social Capital Scale for Families of Children with Chronic Health Conditions
Abstract:
Cross-Cultural Equivalence of the Arabic Social Capital Scale for Families of Children with Chronic Health Conditions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Looman, Wendy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:5-140 WDH, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:6126246604
Co-Authors:W.S. Looman, Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; S. Farrag, Nursing, Mansoura University, Mansoura, EGYPT;
Social capital, defined as an investment in relationships that facilitates the exchange of resources, has been identified as a possible protective factor for child health in the context of risk factors such as poverty. Reliable and valid measures of social capital are needed for research and practice, particularly in non-English-speaking populations in developing countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties and cross-cultural equivalence of the Arabic translation of the Social Capital Scale (SCS). The SCS was originally developed from a theoretical foundation of symbolic interaction and human ecology, using a process of item generation that included concept analysis and focus groups with parents of children with chronic conditions. This descriptive, cross-sectional study took place in two metropolitan health clinics in Alexandria, Egypt. A convenience sample of 117 Egyptian parents of children with chronic conditions participated. The 20-item, translated Arabic SCS was administered as part of a written survey that included additional measures on demographic information and parent ratings of the child's overall health. Six items were ultimately removed based on item analysis, and exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the resulting 14-item scale. As a measure of construct validity, hypothesis testing was conducted using an independent samples t-test to determine whether a significant difference exists between mean total social capital scores for two groups of respondents based on the parental rating of the child's overall health. Item and factor analysis yielded preliminary support for a revised, 14-item Arabic SCS with four internally consistent factors. The standardized item alpha reliability coefficient for the total 14-item scale was .75. Respondents who reported that their child was in good health had significantly higher social capital scores than those who rated their child's health as poor. The Arabic SCS will enable clinicians and researchers to address an important gap in knowledge characterized by a paucity of research on childhood chronic illness in low- and middle-income countries such as Egypt.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCross-Cultural Equivalence of the Arabic Social Capital Scale for Families of Children with Chronic Health Conditionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160808-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cross-Cultural Equivalence of the Arabic Social Capital Scale for Families of Children with Chronic Health Conditions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Looman, Wendy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-140 WDH, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">6126246604</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">looma003@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">W.S. Looman, Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; S. Farrag, Nursing, Mansoura University, Mansoura, EGYPT;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Social capital, defined as an investment in relationships that facilitates the exchange of resources, has been identified as a possible protective factor for child health in the context of risk factors such as poverty. Reliable and valid measures of social capital are needed for research and practice, particularly in non-English-speaking populations in developing countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties and cross-cultural equivalence of the Arabic translation of the Social Capital Scale (SCS). The SCS was originally developed from a theoretical foundation of symbolic interaction and human ecology, using a process of item generation that included concept analysis and focus groups with parents of children with chronic conditions. This descriptive, cross-sectional study took place in two metropolitan health clinics in Alexandria, Egypt. A convenience sample of 117 Egyptian parents of children with chronic conditions participated. The 20-item, translated Arabic SCS was administered as part of a written survey that included additional measures on demographic information and parent ratings of the child's overall health. Six items were ultimately removed based on item analysis, and exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the resulting 14-item scale. As a measure of construct validity, hypothesis testing was conducted using an independent samples t-test to determine whether a significant difference exists between mean total social capital scores for two groups of respondents based on the parental rating of the child's overall health. Item and factor analysis yielded preliminary support for a revised, 14-item Arabic SCS with four internally consistent factors. The standardized item alpha reliability coefficient for the total 14-item scale was .75. Respondents who reported that their child was in good health had significantly higher social capital scores than those who rated their child's health as poor. The Arabic SCS will enable clinicians and researchers to address an important gap in knowledge characterized by a paucity of research on childhood chronic illness in low- and middle-income countries such as Egypt.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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