2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160809
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Illness Beliefs in Patients with Symptomatic Atrial Fibrillation
Abstract:
Illness Beliefs in Patients with Symptomatic Atrial Fibrillation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:McCabe, Pamela, MS
P.I. Institution Name:mayo clinic
Contact Address:509 Parsons Ave., Spring Valley, MN, 55975, USA
Contact Telephone:507-255-2797
Co-Authors:P.J. McCabe, S.A. Barnason, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; P.J. McCabe, Department of Nursing, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN;
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a life complicating illness recognized as a public health epidemic. Understanding beliefs people have about symptoms, cause, control, consequences, and duration of their AF, their illness representation, will provide a foundation for developing patient centered interventions to improve health-related quality of life. However, knowledge about illness representation related to AF is lacking. Aims of this descriptive study guided by Leventhal's Common Sense Model were to: (1) describe illness representation and (2) identify relationships among illness representation domains in persons with symptomatic AF. Subjects (N = 84) recruited from a tertiary care facility, completed the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. Data were analyzed using descriptive methods and Pearson's correlations. A mean of 3.8 (2.65) symptoms were attributed to AF. AF was perceived as a chronic condition (M = 24.11, SD = 4.22) associated with major consequences (M = 20.27, SD = 4.61). Confidence in treatment to control AF was limited (M = 17.57, SD = 2.72); personal control scores (M = 19.16, SD = 4.51) reflected subjects' weak agreement that they could influence the course and symptoms of AF. Subjects believed they clearly understood AF (M = 17.57, SD = 4.12), but agreed that AF produced anxiety, worry, and depression (emotional representation, M = 18.62, SD = 5.33). Perception of AF as cyclic or unpredictable was related to less personal control (r = -.22, p = .04) and more psychological distress (r = .31, p = .004). Better understanding of AF was associated with fewer perceived consequences (r = -.33, p = .002), greater belief in treatment control (r = .37, p = .001) and less psychological distress (r = -.31, p = .01). Subjects who perceived more consequences of AF reported more psychological distress (r = .50, p <.001). Attributing AF to emotional causes was related to poorer understanding of AF (r = -.41, p = < .001), more perceived consequences (r = .44, p = <.001), and more psychological distress (r = .35, p = .001). Further study is needed to determine if interventions targeted toward coping with perceived consequences and unpredictability of AF as well as facilitating understanding of AF will decrease psychological distress in persons with AF.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIllness Beliefs in Patients with Symptomatic Atrial Fibrillationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160809-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Illness Beliefs in Patients with Symptomatic Atrial Fibrillation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCabe, Pamela, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">mayo clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">509 Parsons Ave., Spring Valley, MN, 55975, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-255-2797</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mccabe.pamela2@mayo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.J. McCabe, S.A. Barnason, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; P.J. McCabe, Department of Nursing, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a life complicating illness recognized as a public health epidemic. Understanding beliefs people have about symptoms, cause, control, consequences, and duration of their AF, their illness representation, will provide a foundation for developing patient centered interventions to improve health-related quality of life. However, knowledge about illness representation related to AF is lacking. Aims of this descriptive study guided by Leventhal's Common Sense Model were to: (1) describe illness representation and (2) identify relationships among illness representation domains in persons with symptomatic AF. Subjects (N = 84) recruited from a tertiary care facility, completed the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. Data were analyzed using descriptive methods and Pearson's correlations. A mean of 3.8 (2.65) symptoms were attributed to AF. AF was perceived as a chronic condition (M = 24.11, SD = 4.22) associated with major consequences (M = 20.27, SD = 4.61). Confidence in treatment to control AF was limited (M = 17.57, SD = 2.72); personal control scores (M = 19.16, SD = 4.51) reflected subjects' weak agreement that they could influence the course and symptoms of AF. Subjects believed they clearly understood AF (M = 17.57, SD = 4.12), but agreed that AF produced anxiety, worry, and depression (emotional representation, M = 18.62, SD = 5.33). Perception of AF as cyclic or unpredictable was related to less personal control (r = -.22, p = .04) and more psychological distress (r = .31, p = .004). Better understanding of AF was associated with fewer perceived consequences (r = -.33, p = .002), greater belief in treatment control (r = .37, p = .001) and less psychological distress (r = -.31, p = .01). Subjects who perceived more consequences of AF reported more psychological distress (r = .50, p &lt;.001). Attributing AF to emotional causes was related to poorer understanding of AF (r = -.41, p = &lt; .001), more perceived consequences (r = .44, p = &lt;.001), and more psychological distress (r = .35, p = .001). Further study is needed to determine if interventions targeted toward coping with perceived consequences and unpredictability of AF as well as facilitating understanding of AF will decrease psychological distress in persons with AF.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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