2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160811
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Total Workload and Women's Postpartum Health: A Longitudinal Analyses
Abstract:
Total Workload and Women's Postpartum Health: A Longitudinal Analyses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:McGovern, Patricia, PhD, MPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Public Health
Contact Address:Mayo MMC 807, 420 Delaware St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-625-7429
Co-Authors:P.M. McGovern, School of Public Health, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; R.K. Dagher, Department of Health Services Research,Management,and Policy, University of Florida, Gainsville, FL; H. Roeber-Rice,
Purpose: Many mothers return to work soon after childbirth. Relatively little is known about the impact of work and family commitments on health. This paper investigates the effects of total workload (paid and unpaid work) and psychosocial factors on women's postpartum health. Theoretical Framework: A hybrid of the health and household production theories was employed to estimate three maternal health equations. Subjects: 817 eligible women from the Twin Cities were enrolled while hospitalized for childbirth. Sample selection criteria included: being 18 years or older, employed and English literate. Methods: A prospective cohort design was used to examine the effects of total workload, job satisfaction and stress, social support, breastfeeding, health care utilization, and infant behavior on health. Interviews were conducted at 5 weeks, 11 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after delivery. Mental and physical health was measured using the SF-12, and childbirth-related symptoms were evaluated using a published measure. Panel data analyses were conducted using econometric methods. Results: The 716 women averaged 30 years of age, 86% were Caucasian, and 73% were married. On average, women's total daily workload ranged from 14.4 to 15.1 over 12 months postpartum; daily paid work hours ranged from 0.61 to 7.6. Fixed effects regression analyses revealed higher total workload and infant sleep problems were significantly associated with poorer mental health and increased symptoms. Infant colic was associated with poorer mental health. Increased perceived control and social support were significantly associated with better mental health and fewer symptoms. Conclusions: Policies such as job-protected leave from work or flexible work arrangements may provide the resources needed by mothers for recovery from childbirth, mental health protection and successful integration of commitments. Study findings can be used by nurses to educate new mothers, employers and health care providers serving women of reproductive years, and as the basis for intervention studies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTotal Workload and Women's Postpartum Health: A Longitudinal Analysesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160811-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Total Workload and Women's Postpartum Health: A Longitudinal Analyses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McGovern, Patricia, PhD, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Public Health</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mayo MMC 807, 420 Delaware St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-625-7429</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pmcg@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.M. McGovern, School of Public Health, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; R.K. Dagher, Department of Health Services Research,Management,and Policy, University of Florida, Gainsville, FL; H. Roeber-Rice, </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Many mothers return to work soon after childbirth. Relatively little is known about the impact of work and family commitments on health. This paper investigates the effects of total workload (paid and unpaid work) and psychosocial factors on women's postpartum health. Theoretical Framework: A hybrid of the health and household production theories was employed to estimate three maternal health equations. Subjects: 817 eligible women from the Twin Cities were enrolled while hospitalized for childbirth. Sample selection criteria included: being 18 years or older, employed and English literate. Methods: A prospective cohort design was used to examine the effects of total workload, job satisfaction and stress, social support, breastfeeding, health care utilization, and infant behavior on health. Interviews were conducted at 5 weeks, 11 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after delivery. Mental and physical health was measured using the SF-12, and childbirth-related symptoms were evaluated using a published measure. Panel data analyses were conducted using econometric methods. Results: The 716 women averaged 30 years of age, 86% were Caucasian, and 73% were married. On average, women's total daily workload ranged from 14.4 to 15.1 over 12 months postpartum; daily paid work hours ranged from 0.61 to 7.6. Fixed effects regression analyses revealed higher total workload and infant sleep problems were significantly associated with poorer mental health and increased symptoms. Infant colic was associated with poorer mental health. Increased perceived control and social support were significantly associated with better mental health and fewer symptoms. Conclusions: Policies such as job-protected leave from work or flexible work arrangements may provide the resources needed by mothers for recovery from childbirth, mental health protection and successful integration of commitments. Study findings can be used by nurses to educate new mothers, employers and health care providers serving women of reproductive years, and as the basis for intervention studies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.