2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160814
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship Between Indicators of Gastrointestinal Intolerance and Aspiration
Abstract:
Relationship Between Indicators of Gastrointestinal Intolerance and Aspiration
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Metheny, Norma, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314-977-8941
Co-Authors:N. A. Metheny, B. J. Stewart, R. Wunderlich, Nursing, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO; B.J. Stewart, Nursing, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR;
Problem: Practice guidelines recommend monitoring for signs of gastrointestinal intolerance to assess risk for aspiration in tube-fed patients; among these signs are hypoactive bowel sounds, abdominal distention, high residual volumes, and vomiting. However, the extent to which these variables are associated with aspiration is unclear. Purpose: To determine the association between aspiration and indicators of gastrointestinal intolerance to tube feedings. Theoretical Framework: Slowed gastrointestinal motility predisposes to gastroesophageal reflux and accumulation of gastric secretions in the oropharynx; similarly, vomiting forces gastric contents into the oropharynx. In patients unable to protect their airways, the risk for aspiration is substantially increased. Methods: A prospective descriptive study was conducted to determine the association between indicators of gastrointestinal intolerance and aspiration in a population of 155 critically ill, mechanically ventilated tube-fed patients over a 3-day period. Data collectors were present daily to measure residual volumes and assess for hypoactive bowel sounds and abdominal distention every 4 hours. Also, the incidence of vomiting was recorded. Tracheal secretions collected during routine suctioning were assayed for the gastric enzyme, pepsin; the presence of pepsin served as a proxy for aspiration. Results: Sixty-four (41.3%) of the patients aspirated at least once during the three-day study period. A statistically significant correlation (r=.28, p < .001) was found between the mean percent of vomiting and the mean percent of aspiration in the total sample of 155 patients. A feeding tube residual volume of 100 ml or more correlated significantly (r=.13, p=.049) with the mean percent of aspiration. In the 50 gastric-fed patients, a statistically significant correlation (r=.37, p=.005) was found between the percent of hypoactive bowel sounds and the mean percent of aspiration. Abdominal distention was not significantly related with aspiration. Conclusions: Vomiting, hypoactive bowel sounds, and residual volume are reasonable predictors of aspiration. Funded by NINR: R015007
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship Between Indicators of Gastrointestinal Intolerance and Aspirationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160814-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship Between Indicators of Gastrointestinal Intolerance and Aspiration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Metheny, Norma, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-977-8941</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">methenna@slu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N. A. Metheny, B. J. Stewart, R. Wunderlich, Nursing, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO; B.J. Stewart, Nursing, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Practice guidelines recommend monitoring for signs of gastrointestinal intolerance to assess risk for aspiration in tube-fed patients; among these signs are hypoactive bowel sounds, abdominal distention, high residual volumes, and vomiting. However, the extent to which these variables are associated with aspiration is unclear. Purpose: To determine the association between aspiration and indicators of gastrointestinal intolerance to tube feedings. Theoretical Framework: Slowed gastrointestinal motility predisposes to gastroesophageal reflux and accumulation of gastric secretions in the oropharynx; similarly, vomiting forces gastric contents into the oropharynx. In patients unable to protect their airways, the risk for aspiration is substantially increased. Methods: A prospective descriptive study was conducted to determine the association between indicators of gastrointestinal intolerance and aspiration in a population of 155 critically ill, mechanically ventilated tube-fed patients over a 3-day period. Data collectors were present daily to measure residual volumes and assess for hypoactive bowel sounds and abdominal distention every 4 hours. Also, the incidence of vomiting was recorded. Tracheal secretions collected during routine suctioning were assayed for the gastric enzyme, pepsin; the presence of pepsin served as a proxy for aspiration. Results: Sixty-four (41.3%) of the patients aspirated at least once during the three-day study period. A statistically significant correlation (r=.28, p &lt; .001) was found between the mean percent of vomiting and the mean percent of aspiration in the total sample of 155 patients. A feeding tube residual volume of 100 ml or more correlated significantly (r=.13, p=.049) with the mean percent of aspiration. In the 50 gastric-fed patients, a statistically significant correlation (r=.37, p=.005) was found between the percent of hypoactive bowel sounds and the mean percent of aspiration. Abdominal distention was not significantly related with aspiration. Conclusions: Vomiting, hypoactive bowel sounds, and residual volume are reasonable predictors of aspiration. Funded by NINR: R015007</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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