2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160817
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Different Cultures, Same Female Behavior: A Comparative Study
Abstract:
Different Cultures, Same Female Behavior: A Comparative Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Mohamed, Hanem, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Egypt, Tanta University
Title:Medical Surgical
Contact Address:Tanta University, Faculty of Nursing, Tanta, 40, Egypt
Contact Telephone:106995038
Co-Authors:H. F. Mohamed, F.A. Gary, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; H.F. Mohamed, F.A. Gary, Nursing, Tanta University, Egypt, EGYPT; H. Saied, , Cairo University, Cairo, EGYPT;
Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality among women. Women are more likely to perceive their symptoms as less serious and they engage in different treatment-seeking behavior before accessing medical help which affect their outcomes. The purpose of this study was to compare results of two studies that were done on American and Egyptian women. The aim of the 2 studies was to examine the direct and indirect effect of knowledge, perception, treatment-seeking behavior and time-to-treatment on psychological distress for women with first time AMI. A correlational cross sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 53 American women ( mean age 60.3 years, SD, 13.7) and 100 Egyptian women (mean age 55.6 years, SD, 10.4) with first time AMI participated in face-to-face interview after they were physiologically stable. Median delay time was 3 hours for American women and 6 hours for Egyptian women. One third of the American women perceived their symptoms as serious and one third perceived their symptoms as not at all serious. On the other hand, 70% of Egyptian women perceived their symptoms as not at all serious and 30% perceived their symptoms as serious. In addition, 67% of the American women used self medication strategies to cope with their symptoms while 80% of the Egyptian women used the same strategies to cope with their symptoms. Women from the 2 nationalities had high knowledge regarding typical risk factors and symptoms associated with AMI, and reported low knowledge regarding gender-specific risk factors and atypical symptoms of AMI. Regression analysis revealed that knowledge of AMI symptoms mostly predicted perception of symptoms seriousness. Controlling for education, marital status, type of treatment, and severity of AMI, path analysis indicated that treatment-seeking behavior, knowledge of AMI symptoms, and perception of symptoms seriousness had the most direct, indirect and total effect on women's psychological status. Recommendations for nursing practice, theory and future research were made.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDifferent Cultures, Same Female Behavior: A Comparative Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160817-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Different Cultures, Same Female Behavior: A Comparative Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mohamed, Hanem, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Egypt, Tanta University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Medical Surgical</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Tanta University, Faculty of Nursing, Tanta, 40, Egypt</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">106995038</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hanemfm@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">H. F. Mohamed, F.A. Gary, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; H.F. Mohamed, F.A. Gary, Nursing, Tanta University, Egypt, EGYPT; H. Saied, , Cairo University, Cairo, EGYPT;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality among women. Women are more likely to perceive their symptoms as less serious and they engage in different treatment-seeking behavior before accessing medical help which affect their outcomes. The purpose of this study was to compare results of two studies that were done on American and Egyptian women. The aim of the 2 studies was to examine the direct and indirect effect of knowledge, perception, treatment-seeking behavior and time-to-treatment on psychological distress for women with first time AMI. A correlational cross sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 53 American women ( mean age 60.3 years, SD, 13.7) and 100 Egyptian women (mean age 55.6 years, SD, 10.4) with first time AMI participated in face-to-face interview after they were physiologically stable. Median delay time was 3 hours for American women and 6 hours for Egyptian women. One third of the American women perceived their symptoms as serious and one third perceived their symptoms as not at all serious. On the other hand, 70% of Egyptian women perceived their symptoms as not at all serious and 30% perceived their symptoms as serious. In addition, 67% of the American women used self medication strategies to cope with their symptoms while 80% of the Egyptian women used the same strategies to cope with their symptoms. Women from the 2 nationalities had high knowledge regarding typical risk factors and symptoms associated with AMI, and reported low knowledge regarding gender-specific risk factors and atypical symptoms of AMI. Regression analysis revealed that knowledge of AMI symptoms mostly predicted perception of symptoms seriousness. Controlling for education, marital status, type of treatment, and severity of AMI, path analysis indicated that treatment-seeking behavior, knowledge of AMI symptoms, and perception of symptoms seriousness had the most direct, indirect and total effect on women's psychological status. Recommendations for nursing practice, theory and future research were made.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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