2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160819
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Care Nurses' Inclusion of Families in End of Life Care
Abstract:
Critical Care Nurses' Inclusion of Families in End of Life Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:6-109 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St., Minneapolis, MN, 55082, USA
Contact Telephone:612 624-0449
Co-Authors:C. Peden-McAlpine, J. Liaschenko, S. O'Conner-Von, , University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
National estimates in the USA are that twenty five percent of patients die usually within the first 3 days of admission to critical care units. Given these estimates, end of life care in critical care units has become an area of recent interest and research. Although much attention has been given to end of life care in critical care, little is known about how nurses care for families of dying patients and include them in the dying patient's care. This paper will report a qualitative study of family inclusion in end of life care by nurses. Four focus groups were conducted with critical care nurses using an interview guide focused on how nurses provide end of life care for families. The focus groups were audio-taped and transcribed in to a written text. Content analysis informed by Tesh, and Corbin and Strauss was used for text analysis to generate themes. A major theme: Supporting the families' journey through the dying process of their loved one is a major theme of the study that will be reported here. This theme has 2 subthemes: 1) Building trusting relationships with families that describes how nurses gain family trust quickly by giving honest answers to difficult questions along with willingness to get more information for families to piece together a comprehensive picture of the patient's status and; 2) Orchestrating, interpreting and acting on information for families that describes how nurses act as coordinators of information and obtain information about the patients status from numerous sources to assemble a comprehensive picture of the information to communicate to the family. From these themes, a discussion including implications for nursing administration and clinical practice will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Care Nurses' Inclusion of Families in End of Life Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160819-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Critical Care Nurses' Inclusion of Families in End of Life Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6-109 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St., Minneapolis, MN, 55082, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612 624-0449</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">peden001@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Peden-McAlpine, J. Liaschenko, S. O'Conner-Von, , University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">National estimates in the USA are that twenty five percent of patients die usually within the first 3 days of admission to critical care units. Given these estimates, end of life care in critical care units has become an area of recent interest and research. Although much attention has been given to end of life care in critical care, little is known about how nurses care for families of dying patients and include them in the dying patient's care. This paper will report a qualitative study of family inclusion in end of life care by nurses. Four focus groups were conducted with critical care nurses using an interview guide focused on how nurses provide end of life care for families. The focus groups were audio-taped and transcribed in to a written text. Content analysis informed by Tesh, and Corbin and Strauss was used for text analysis to generate themes. A major theme: Supporting the families' journey through the dying process of their loved one is a major theme of the study that will be reported here. This theme has 2 subthemes: 1) Building trusting relationships with families that describes how nurses gain family trust quickly by giving honest answers to difficult questions along with willingness to get more information for families to piece together a comprehensive picture of the patient's status and; 2) Orchestrating, interpreting and acting on information for families that describes how nurses act as coordinators of information and obtain information about the patients status from numerous sources to assemble a comprehensive picture of the information to communicate to the family. From these themes, a discussion including implications for nursing administration and clinical practice will be presented. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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