2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160820
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Psychoeducational Program for Treatment of Depression in Women with Diabetes
Abstract:
A Psychoeducational Program for Treatment of Depression in Women with Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Penckofer, Sue, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:Bldg 105, Rm 2840, 2160 S. First Avenue, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Contact Telephone:708-216-9303
Co-Authors:S. Penckofer, M. Byrn, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; C. Ferrans, College of Nursing, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL; P. Mumby, School of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL;
Depression affects 25% of persons with diabetes. More women than men with diabetes have depression, and it worsens their medical prognosis. Depression is often associated with other dysphoric symptoms such as anxiety and anger. Negative emotions are associated with decreased quality of life for individuals with diabetes. The revised Wilson and Cleary Health-Related Quality of Life Framework guides this study in that dysphoric symptoms (depression, anxiety and anger), clinical variables, and quality of life are being examined. The methodology includes a randomized clinical trial to evaluate whether a psychoeducational program delivered by a nurse improves depression in women with type 2 diabetes. The Study of Women's Emotions and Evaluation of a Psychoeducational (SWEEP) Program includes learning new coping strategies, changing negative thought patterns, and using effective communication skills for treatment of depression. Forty eight women with significant depressive symptoms at baseline have completed the pre-treatment and three month post-treatment measures (control=26, treatment=22; 91% of sample). There has been a significant decrease (p=.041) in depressive symptoms for the treatment group (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: 23.95 to 14.86) as compared to the control group (26.11 to 22.35). Other dysphoric symptoms such as anxiety (State Trait Anxiety: 48.38 to 40.29, p=.003) and anger (State Trait Anger: 18.63 to 16.59, p=.005) have improved, and quality of life has increased (16.31 to 18.32, p=.012) for the treatment group. There was also a trend for less diabetes distress (48.03 to 40.00, p=.065) and a decreased fear of diabetes complications (25.10 to 21.77, p=.061) for this group. No significant improvements for these measures were noted in the control group. Although HbA1c decreased (Treatment: 7.6 to 7.3, Control: 8.0 to 7.8), the difference was not statistically significant. Six month follow-up data is being collected to determine the long term benefit. In addition, women continue to be enrolled in the trial. Results provide preliminary evidence for the efficacy of SWEEP as a promising therapy for nurses to use in caring for women with diabetes who have significant depressive symptoms. (NINR K23NR009240)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Psychoeducational Program for Treatment of Depression in Women with Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160820-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Psychoeducational Program for Treatment of Depression in Women with Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Penckofer, Sue, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Bldg 105, Rm 2840, 2160 S. First Avenue, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708-216-9303</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">spencko@luc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Penckofer, M. Byrn, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; C. Ferrans, College of Nursing, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL; P. Mumby, School of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depression affects 25% of persons with diabetes. More women than men with diabetes have depression, and it worsens their medical prognosis. Depression is often associated with other dysphoric symptoms such as anxiety and anger. Negative emotions are associated with decreased quality of life for individuals with diabetes. The revised Wilson and Cleary Health-Related Quality of Life Framework guides this study in that dysphoric symptoms (depression, anxiety and anger), clinical variables, and quality of life are being examined. The methodology includes a randomized clinical trial to evaluate whether a psychoeducational program delivered by a nurse improves depression in women with type 2 diabetes. The Study of Women's Emotions and Evaluation of a Psychoeducational (SWEEP) Program includes learning new coping strategies, changing negative thought patterns, and using effective communication skills for treatment of depression. Forty eight women with significant depressive symptoms at baseline have completed the pre-treatment and three month post-treatment measures (control=26, treatment=22; 91% of sample). There has been a significant decrease (p=.041) in depressive symptoms for the treatment group (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: 23.95 to 14.86) as compared to the control group (26.11 to 22.35). Other dysphoric symptoms such as anxiety (State Trait Anxiety: 48.38 to 40.29, p=.003) and anger (State Trait Anger: 18.63 to 16.59, p=.005) have improved, and quality of life has increased (16.31 to 18.32, p=.012) for the treatment group. There was also a trend for less diabetes distress (48.03 to 40.00, p=.065) and a decreased fear of diabetes complications (25.10 to 21.77, p=.061) for this group. No significant improvements for these measures were noted in the control group. Although HbA1c decreased (Treatment: 7.6 to 7.3, Control: 8.0 to 7.8), the difference was not statistically significant. Six month follow-up data is being collected to determine the long term benefit. In addition, women continue to be enrolled in the trial. Results provide preliminary evidence for the efficacy of SWEEP as a promising therapy for nurses to use in caring for women with diabetes who have significant depressive symptoms. (NINR K23NR009240)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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