Cardiovascular and Central Nervous System Responses to Racism Among African Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160821
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cardiovascular and Central Nervous System Responses to Racism Among African Americans
Abstract:
Cardiovascular and Central Nervous System Responses to Racism Among African Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Peters, Rosalind, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Contact Address:5557 Cass Ave., Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313-577-0342
Co-Authors:R.M. Peters, K. Butler, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; N. Boutros, V. Yeragani, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;
Problem: Chronic stress from perceived racism may contribute to the disparity in hypertension prevalence for African Americans. Research results regarding racism and hypertension are mixed. Theory: In Lazarus' Theory of Emotion, personal antecedents affect appraisal of a stressor and the emotion attached to the event. The valence of the stress emotion generates acute physiologic coping involving the central nervous system ([CNS], gating) and the cardiovascular system (blood pressure [BP], heart rate {HR]). Repeated responses to acute stressors determine long-term health effects. Methodology: A quasi-experimental pilot study examined the relationship between perceived racism and physiologic and psychologic coping responses to an acute, racially-charged stimulus, and determined the feasibility of such a study. A convenience sample of 17 normotensive African Americans participated. Personal antecedents were measured using: Racism and Life Experiences Scale-Brief; Krieger Discrimination Questionnaire; and Brief-Cope. (Cronbach's alphas .86 to .89). Physiologic coping was measured using BP (recorded after each stimulus) and continuous electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram recordings. Levels of anger and anxiety measured psychological coping. Participants viewed a neutral stimulus followed by the aversive stimulus (lynching image). Both stimuli were repeated 10 times to assess CNS gating. Descriptive analyses, bivariate correlations, and t-tests were conducted. Interpretation: There were no significant correlations between antecedents and coping responses, and no significant differences in cardiovascular responses based on gating. The lack of statistical trends may be due to methodological limitations including: small sample; lynching image did not provoke cardiovascular reactivity making it a questionable aversive stimulus and limiting its usefulness to assess gating. BP was higher following neutral rather than aversive stimulus for some; transportation and laboratory availability affected recruitment. Implications: Understanding the relationship between perceived racism and physiological coping with acute racial stress could lead to interventions that may contribute to reducing hypertension among African Americans.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCardiovascular and Central Nervous System Responses to Racism Among African Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160821-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cardiovascular and Central Nervous System Responses to Racism Among African Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peters, Rosalind, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5557 Cass Ave., Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-577-0342</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rpeters@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R.M. Peters, K. Butler, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; N. Boutros, V. Yeragani, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Chronic stress from perceived racism may contribute to the disparity in hypertension prevalence for African Americans. Research results regarding racism and hypertension are mixed. Theory: In Lazarus' Theory of Emotion, personal antecedents affect appraisal of a stressor and the emotion attached to the event. The valence of the stress emotion generates acute physiologic coping involving the central nervous system ([CNS], gating) and the cardiovascular system (blood pressure [BP], heart rate {HR]). Repeated responses to acute stressors determine long-term health effects. Methodology: A quasi-experimental pilot study examined the relationship between perceived racism and physiologic and psychologic coping responses to an acute, racially-charged stimulus, and determined the feasibility of such a study. A convenience sample of 17 normotensive African Americans participated. Personal antecedents were measured using: Racism and Life Experiences Scale-Brief; Krieger Discrimination Questionnaire; and Brief-Cope. (Cronbach's alphas .86 to .89). Physiologic coping was measured using BP (recorded after each stimulus) and continuous electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram recordings. Levels of anger and anxiety measured psychological coping. Participants viewed a neutral stimulus followed by the aversive stimulus (lynching image). Both stimuli were repeated 10 times to assess CNS gating. Descriptive analyses, bivariate correlations, and t-tests were conducted. Interpretation: There were no significant correlations between antecedents and coping responses, and no significant differences in cardiovascular responses based on gating. The lack of statistical trends may be due to methodological limitations including: small sample; lynching image did not provoke cardiovascular reactivity making it a questionable aversive stimulus and limiting its usefulness to assess gating. BP was higher following neutral rather than aversive stimulus for some; transportation and laboratory availability affected recruitment. Implications: Understanding the relationship between perceived racism and physiological coping with acute racial stress could lead to interventions that may contribute to reducing hypertension among African Americans.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.