2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160823
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Substance Abuse and Chronic Venous Disorders
Abstract:
Substance Abuse and Chronic Venous Disorders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Pieper, Barbara, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313-5774057
Co-Authors:B.A. Pieper, T.N. Templin, Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; R.S. Kirsner, Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL; T.J. Birk, Department of Health Care Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;
Purpose: This study examined the occurrence of chronic venous disorders (CVD) and risk factors for its development in injection drug users. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Injected drugs increase the risk of deep and superficial venous thrombosis and destroy veins from the trauma (i.e., repeated injection, irritating qualities of the abused drugs and substances, and localized infection). Venous damage can lead to CVD. Subjects: Participants (N = 713) were 335 men (46.9%) and 378 women with M plus SD age = 46.26 plus 9.06 years. Four hundred forty (61.7%) were African American, 64.5% had a high school education or higher, and 30.0% were employed. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional. The sample was stratified on age, sex, ethnicity, and drug use (non-injection drug use, arm/upper body injection only, or legs plus upper body). Instruments included demographic, health and substances abuse questionnaires and the clinical leg assessment of the Clinical-Etiology-Anatomy-Pathophysiology (CEAP) Classification. Participants were recruited from 12 methadone treatment clinics. Results: Injecting in the groin, legs, and feet was associated with a significantly higher clinical CEAP classification than those who never injected or those who injected in the arms/upper body only F(2, 676) = 44.12, p < .001. Of the 10 specific venous disorders examined, seven were significantly associated with leg injection. Three disorders, pigmentation, eczema, and lipodermatosclerosis, were most highly associated with active or healed ulcers. Years of injecting in veins of the legs were clearly nonlinear, monotonic, and decelerating with the greatest increase in disease occurrence in the first seven years. Conclusions: CVD is associated with injecting in the groin, legs and feet as compared to other sites. Protocols for leg assessment and methods to protect the legs need to be developed and tested with injection users. Funding: National Institute of Nursing Research/National Institute of Health (NINR/NIH), R01 NR009264.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSubstance Abuse and Chronic Venous Disordersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160823-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Substance Abuse and Chronic Venous Disorders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pieper, Barbara, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-5774057</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bapieper@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.A. Pieper, T.N. Templin, Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; R.S. Kirsner, Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL; T.J. Birk, Department of Health Care Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study examined the occurrence of chronic venous disorders (CVD) and risk factors for its development in injection drug users. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Injected drugs increase the risk of deep and superficial venous thrombosis and destroy veins from the trauma (i.e., repeated injection, irritating qualities of the abused drugs and substances, and localized infection). Venous damage can lead to CVD. Subjects: Participants (N = 713) were 335 men (46.9%) and 378 women with M plus SD age = 46.26 plus 9.06 years. Four hundred forty (61.7%) were African American, 64.5% had a high school education or higher, and 30.0% were employed. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional. The sample was stratified on age, sex, ethnicity, and drug use (non-injection drug use, arm/upper body injection only, or legs plus upper body). Instruments included demographic, health and substances abuse questionnaires and the clinical leg assessment of the Clinical-Etiology-Anatomy-Pathophysiology (CEAP) Classification. Participants were recruited from 12 methadone treatment clinics. Results: Injecting in the groin, legs, and feet was associated with a significantly higher clinical CEAP classification than those who never injected or those who injected in the arms/upper body only F(2, 676) = 44.12, p &lt; .001. Of the 10 specific venous disorders examined, seven were significantly associated with leg injection. Three disorders, pigmentation, eczema, and lipodermatosclerosis, were most highly associated with active or healed ulcers. Years of injecting in veins of the legs were clearly nonlinear, monotonic, and decelerating with the greatest increase in disease occurrence in the first seven years. Conclusions: CVD is associated with injecting in the groin, legs and feet as compared to other sites. Protocols for leg assessment and methods to protect the legs need to be developed and tested with injection users. Funding: National Institute of Nursing Research/National Institute of Health (NINR/NIH), R01 NR009264.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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