Motivating Forces for Parenting Infants with a Congenital Heart Defect: Family, Infant, and Parent Conditions and Interaction Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160824
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivating Forces for Parenting Infants with a Congenital Heart Defect: Family, Infant, and Parent Conditions and Interaction Outcomes
Abstract:
Motivating Forces for Parenting Infants with a Congenital Heart Defect: Family, Infant, and Parent Conditions and Interaction Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:2011 Van Hise Ave., Madison, WI, 53726-4054, USA
Contact Telephone:608-238-7536
Co-Authors:K. Pridham, R. Brown, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; T. Harrison, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; M. Krolikowski, Cardiovascular Surgery, Herma Heart Center, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin,
Purpose: Explore family, infant, and parent conditions and feeding interaction quality associated with motivating forces (MFs) for parenting an infant with a complex congenital heart defect (CCHD). Theoretical framework: Motivating forces organize parenting internal working models (IWMs) (Bowlby, 1988). MFs may concern infant care and development, guarding infant health, relating to the infant, strengthening the family, developing parenting identity, maintaining/ promoting self, or accomplishing tasks. MFs and differentially relate to parental feeding behavior and with conditions (Solomon & George, 1999). Subjects: Primary caregiving, demographically diverse parents whose infant with a CCHD received heart center care (22 mothers, 2 fathers). Method. At 1-month post-birth, self reported on personal attributes (parity, years of education, depression symptoms) and illness impact on the family, and participated in a semi-structured interview concerning IWMs. A pediatric cardiologist graded CCHD severity. MFs were coded with directed content analysis. Feeding behavior was coded with Parent-Child Early Relational observational scales (Clark, 1999); an interaction variable, Parental Sensitivity, Attunement, and Warmth (PSAW), included 9 items. Latent cluster analysis reduced MFs, and interactive graphical analysis (GGobi) was used to explore association of MF clusters with conditions and PSAW. Results. Two MF clusters were identified: Accomplishing Tasks ( n = 16) and Parenting ( n = 8). Graphical analyses for Accomplishing Tasks revealed evenness between depression and no depression scores and between primiparity and multiparity, dispersion across the range of family impact and PSAW scores, lower severity ratings, and higher education. Parenting was associated more with depression than with no depression, more with multiparas than with primiparas, dispersion of severity ratings, family impact scores that clustered in the middle of study values, lower education, and fewer PSAW scores of clinical concern. Conclusions. Exploratory analyses suggest hypotheses for a larger study of conditions and parental feeding behavior associated with clusters of MFs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivating Forces for Parenting Infants with a Congenital Heart Defect: Family, Infant, and Parent Conditions and Interaction Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160824-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivating Forces for Parenting Infants with a Congenital Heart Defect: Family, Infant, and Parent Conditions and Interaction Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2011 Van Hise Ave., Madison, WI, 53726-4054, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-238-7536</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kpridham@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Pridham, R. Brown, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; T. Harrison, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; M. Krolikowski, Cardiovascular Surgery, Herma Heart Center, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Explore family, infant, and parent conditions and feeding interaction quality associated with motivating forces (MFs) for parenting an infant with a complex congenital heart defect (CCHD). Theoretical framework: Motivating forces organize parenting internal working models (IWMs) (Bowlby, 1988). MFs may concern infant care and development, guarding infant health, relating to the infant, strengthening the family, developing parenting identity, maintaining/ promoting self, or accomplishing tasks. MFs and differentially relate to parental feeding behavior and with conditions (Solomon &amp; George, 1999). Subjects: Primary caregiving, demographically diverse parents whose infant with a CCHD received heart center care (22 mothers, 2 fathers). Method. At 1-month post-birth, self reported on personal attributes (parity, years of education, depression symptoms) and illness impact on the family, and participated in a semi-structured interview concerning IWMs. A pediatric cardiologist graded CCHD severity. MFs were coded with directed content analysis. Feeding behavior was coded with Parent-Child Early Relational observational scales (Clark, 1999); an interaction variable, Parental Sensitivity, Attunement, and Warmth (PSAW), included 9 items. Latent cluster analysis reduced MFs, and interactive graphical analysis (GGobi) was used to explore association of MF clusters with conditions and PSAW. Results. Two MF clusters were identified: Accomplishing Tasks ( n = 16) and Parenting ( n = 8). Graphical analyses for Accomplishing Tasks revealed evenness between depression and no depression scores and between primiparity and multiparity, dispersion across the range of family impact and PSAW scores, lower severity ratings, and higher education. Parenting was associated more with depression than with no depression, more with multiparas than with primiparas, dispersion of severity ratings, family impact scores that clustered in the middle of study values, lower education, and fewer PSAW scores of clinical concern. Conclusions. Exploratory analyses suggest hypotheses for a larger study of conditions and parental feeding behavior associated with clusters of MFs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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