2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160826
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Perceptions of Kangaroo Care in Neonatal Units
Abstract:
Nurses' Perceptions of Kangaroo Care in Neonatal Units
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Reising, Deanna, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, ANEF
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:1033 East Third Street, Sycamore 405, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA
Contact Telephone:812-855-1728
Co-Authors:D.L. Reising, A.C. Gruen, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN;
Introduction: Kangaroo care, also known as skin-to-skin holding, permits parents to hold their low birth weight infants, wearing only a diaper and sometimes a cap and socks, underneath their clothing skin-to-skin. Kangaroo Care was first implemented in Bogotá, Columbia as a way to overcome financial limitations and improve cross- and nosocomial infection rates. The results of this care initially showed significant decline in mortality, morbidity, and parental abandonment (Anderson, Marks, & Wahlberg, 1986). The majority of research has focused on the physiological effects of Kangaroo Care and infant readiness. Comparatively, little research has been done on parent readiness and nurse readiness; however, all three systems need to demonstrate readiness in order for the care to take place. Purpose: The purposes of this study are to: 1) explore registered nurses' perceptions regarding kangaroo care; 2) compare the perceptions of registered nurses between two level II nurseries; and 3) examine the need for a written policy and/or nurse education. Study Design and Methods: A prospective, descriptive, survey design was used. Participants included twenty-five registered nurses in two Level II neonatal units. All participants completed questionnaires regarding their perceptions of kangaroo care. Results: Nurses from both units reported a knowledge deficit related to providing kangaroo care. Nurses from both units also reported infant physiologic barriers to care that are not identified as barriers in the literature such as ventilator use and body temperature. Concern for parent privacy was identified as a structural barrier and nurses tended not to recommend kangaroo care to teenage mothers. Conclusions: Education programs for nurses and hospital policies are needed. Further research on nurse perceptions is also needed to identify any biases in relation to region of country and size of nurseries. Relevance to Nursing Practice: This study directly relates to how nurses provide kangaroo care within their practice. Physiologic, environmental, and cultural barriers should be addressed for nurses to feel more comfortable in recommending kangaroo care to parents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Perceptions of Kangaroo Care in Neonatal Unitsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160826-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses' Perceptions of Kangaroo Care in Neonatal Units</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reising, Deanna, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, ANEF</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1033 East Third Street, Sycamore 405, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812-855-1728</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dreising@indiana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D.L. Reising, A.C. Gruen, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Kangaroo care, also known as skin-to-skin holding, permits parents to hold their low birth weight infants, wearing only a diaper and sometimes a cap and socks, underneath their clothing skin-to-skin. Kangaroo Care was first implemented in Bogot&aacute;, Columbia as a way to overcome financial limitations and improve cross- and nosocomial infection rates. The results of this care initially showed significant decline in mortality, morbidity, and parental abandonment (Anderson, Marks, &amp; Wahlberg, 1986). The majority of research has focused on the physiological effects of Kangaroo Care and infant readiness. Comparatively, little research has been done on parent readiness and nurse readiness; however, all three systems need to demonstrate readiness in order for the care to take place. Purpose: The purposes of this study are to: 1) explore registered nurses' perceptions regarding kangaroo care; 2) compare the perceptions of registered nurses between two level II nurseries; and 3) examine the need for a written policy and/or nurse education. Study Design and Methods: A prospective, descriptive, survey design was used. Participants included twenty-five registered nurses in two Level II neonatal units. All participants completed questionnaires regarding their perceptions of kangaroo care. Results: Nurses from both units reported a knowledge deficit related to providing kangaroo care. Nurses from both units also reported infant physiologic barriers to care that are not identified as barriers in the literature such as ventilator use and body temperature. Concern for parent privacy was identified as a structural barrier and nurses tended not to recommend kangaroo care to teenage mothers. Conclusions: Education programs for nurses and hospital policies are needed. Further research on nurse perceptions is also needed to identify any biases in relation to region of country and size of nurseries. Relevance to Nursing Practice: This study directly relates to how nurses provide kangaroo care within their practice. Physiologic, environmental, and cultural barriers should be addressed for nurses to feel more comfortable in recommending kangaroo care to parents.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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