Boys' Perceived Benefits of, Barriers to, and Suggestions for Increasing Physical Activity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160827
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Boys' Perceived Benefits of, Barriers to, and Suggestions for Increasing Physical Activity
Abstract:
Boys' Perceived Benefits of, Barriers to, and Suggestions for Increasing Physical Activity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Robbins, Lorraine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Contact Address:422A West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48103, USA
Contact Telephone:517-353-3011
Co-Authors:L.B. Robbins, H.C. Talley, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI;
Regular physical activity (PA) is essential for maintaining physical health, enhancing psychological well-being, and preventing premature death. Overweight and obesity have been identified as major contributors to preventable death, yet the number of overweight or obese adolescent boys has risen over the past few decades. Inadequate PA is a major factor for weight gain, and a sharp decline in boys' moderate to vigorous PA begins during the middle school years; therefore, an urgent need exists to intervene as soon as boys reach middle school to help them meet national PA recommendations. Factors related to health-promoting behaviors differ between genders and developmental periods. Interventions that are individually tailored to address the needs of various subgroups are more likely to increase PA than standard "one-size-fits-all-youth" interventions. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore 6th-grade boys' perceptions concerning PA with regard to related benefits, barriers, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and situational or environmental influences. These factors are identified as behavior-specific cognitions and affect in nursing's Health Promotion Model, which served to guide the focus group discussions. Strategies for increasing boys' PA were also addressed in each group. A total of 40 racially diverse 6th-grade boys, each participated in one of seven focus groups. Atlas/ti for Windows was used for data analysis. Participants identified "to have an average weight" as the most prominent benefit of PA. Several perceived barriers to PA emerged that were categorized as either personal or environmental. Suggestions to increase PA included "making it fun" and appealing to boys and providing both interpersonal and environmental support. Ways to make PA more enjoyable were specified. The findings, which can be integrated into PA interventions to enhance their effectiveness, have important implications for nurses interested in designing programs or influencing policies to assist boys of this age in achieving national PA recommendations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBoys' Perceived Benefits of, Barriers to, and Suggestions for Increasing Physical Activityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160827-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Boys' Perceived Benefits of, Barriers to, and Suggestions for Increasing Physical Activity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robbins, Lorraine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">422A West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517-353-3011</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">robbin76@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.B. Robbins, H.C. Talley, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Regular physical activity (PA) is essential for maintaining physical health, enhancing psychological well-being, and preventing premature death. Overweight and obesity have been identified as major contributors to preventable death, yet the number of overweight or obese adolescent boys has risen over the past few decades. Inadequate PA is a major factor for weight gain, and a sharp decline in boys' moderate to vigorous PA begins during the middle school years; therefore, an urgent need exists to intervene as soon as boys reach middle school to help them meet national PA recommendations. Factors related to health-promoting behaviors differ between genders and developmental periods. Interventions that are individually tailored to address the needs of various subgroups are more likely to increase PA than standard &quot;one-size-fits-all-youth&quot; interventions. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore 6th-grade boys' perceptions concerning PA with regard to related benefits, barriers, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and situational or environmental influences. These factors are identified as behavior-specific cognitions and affect in nursing's Health Promotion Model, which served to guide the focus group discussions. Strategies for increasing boys' PA were also addressed in each group. A total of 40 racially diverse 6th-grade boys, each participated in one of seven focus groups. Atlas/ti for Windows was used for data analysis. Participants identified &quot;to have an average weight&quot; as the most prominent benefit of PA. Several perceived barriers to PA emerged that were categorized as either personal or environmental. Suggestions to increase PA included &quot;making it fun&quot; and appealing to boys and providing both interpersonal and environmental support. Ways to make PA more enjoyable were specified. The findings, which can be integrated into PA interventions to enhance their effectiveness, have important implications for nurses interested in designing programs or influencing policies to assist boys of this age in achieving national PA recommendations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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