Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Measure Assessing Young Women's Representations of 8 Sexually Transmitted Infections (ROSTI)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160828
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Measure Assessing Young Women's Representations of 8 Sexually Transmitted Infections (ROSTI)
Abstract:
Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Measure Assessing Young Women's Representations of 8 Sexually Transmitted Infections (ROSTI)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Royer, Heather, PhD, APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:600 Highland Avenue, CSC K6/333, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-5300
Co-Authors:H.R. Royer, S.M. Heidrich, School of Nursing, UW-Madison, Madison, WI;
Background: One in four young women has a sexually transmitted infection (STI). The Common Sense Model (CSM) posits that people have representations (i.e., beliefs) about illnesses that drive health behavior. It is necessary to examine young women's STI representations in order to reveal potential misconceptions about STIs; this information can be used to guide future interventions to prevent STIs. However, no psychometrically established measure of young women's representations of the eight major STIs exists to obtain this information. Purpose: To develop and test the psychometric properties of an instrument (ROSTI) that measures young women's representations of eight STIs (Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, Trichomoniasis, Syphilis, HPV, HSV, Hepatitis B, and HIV). Methods and Results: Three studies were completed. In Study 1, interviews were conducted with young women (n=7) to: 1) describe their representations about STIs and 2) develop items to assess representations of STIs. The results were used to develop the ROSTI. In Study 2, patient (n=10) and expert (n=8) panels were used to: 1) test the content validity of the ROSTI and 2) revise the ROSTI based on panelists' recommendations. The content validity index (S-CVI/Ave) for the ROSTI was 0.92. In Study 3, ROSTI data from 302 women were used to: 1) test the construct validity of the ROSTI and 2) determine the reliability of the ROSTI. A four-factor structure for seven of the eight STIs was identified following both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. The factors (ROSTI subscales) included: Future Perspective, Cause, Psychosocial Consequence, and Identity. Internal consistency for the ROSTI subscales (across STIs) ranged from 0.67-0.93. All of the subscales (except one) had test-retest correlations that ranged from 0.69-0.90. Although the factor structure was consistent across seven of the eight STIs, there were significant differences in the mean subscale scores. Conclusion: The ROSTI (for seven of eight STIs) shows evidence of reliability and validity in young women. The findings can guide: 1) replication in different populations (e.g., men or different age groups) and 2) the development of representational interventions among young women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment and Psychometric Evaluation of a Measure Assessing Young Women's Representations of 8 Sexually Transmitted Infections (ROSTI)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160828-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Measure Assessing Young Women's Representations of 8 Sexually Transmitted Infections (ROSTI)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Royer, Heather, PhD, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">600 Highland Avenue, CSC K6/333, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-5300</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hroyer@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">H.R. Royer, S.M. Heidrich, School of Nursing, UW-Madison, Madison, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: One in four young women has a sexually transmitted infection (STI). The Common Sense Model (CSM) posits that people have representations (i.e., beliefs) about illnesses that drive health behavior. It is necessary to examine young women's STI representations in order to reveal potential misconceptions about STIs; this information can be used to guide future interventions to prevent STIs. However, no psychometrically established measure of young women's representations of the eight major STIs exists to obtain this information. Purpose: To develop and test the psychometric properties of an instrument (ROSTI) that measures young women's representations of eight STIs (Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, Trichomoniasis, Syphilis, HPV, HSV, Hepatitis B, and HIV). Methods and Results: Three studies were completed. In Study 1, interviews were conducted with young women (n=7) to: 1) describe their representations about STIs and 2) develop items to assess representations of STIs. The results were used to develop the ROSTI. In Study 2, patient (n=10) and expert (n=8) panels were used to: 1) test the content validity of the ROSTI and 2) revise the ROSTI based on panelists' recommendations. The content validity index (S-CVI/Ave) for the ROSTI was 0.92. In Study 3, ROSTI data from 302 women were used to: 1) test the construct validity of the ROSTI and 2) determine the reliability of the ROSTI. A four-factor structure for seven of the eight STIs was identified following both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. The factors (ROSTI subscales) included: Future Perspective, Cause, Psychosocial Consequence, and Identity. Internal consistency for the ROSTI subscales (across STIs) ranged from 0.67-0.93. All of the subscales (except one) had test-retest correlations that ranged from 0.69-0.90. Although the factor structure was consistent across seven of the eight STIs, there were significant differences in the mean subscale scores. Conclusion: The ROSTI (for seven of eight STIs) shows evidence of reliability and validity in young women. The findings can guide: 1) replication in different populations (e.g., men or different age groups) and 2) the development of representational interventions among young women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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