Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Self-Reported Exercise Behavior and Functional Outcomes in Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160832
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Self-Reported Exercise Behavior and Functional Outcomes in Older Adults
Abstract:
Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Self-Reported Exercise Behavior and Functional Outcomes in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Schneider, Joanne, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314-977-8937
Co-Authors:J.K. Schneider, School of Nursing, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO; J.H. Cook, Department of Psychology, McKendree University, Lebanon, IL;
Despite the benefits of exercise, more than 54% of older adults did not maintain recommended exercise levels. The purpose of this study was to compare self-reported exercise behavior and functional outcomes over one year after exercise initiation across three groups of older adults: a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) group, an attention-control health education group, and a control group. Consistent with the self-regulation of exercise maintenance model, the goal of the CBT intervention was to teach participants to recognize and modify their negative thoughts about exercise. After randomization, all three groups received exercise training 3x/wk for two weeks, then 1x/wk for eight weeks during which time the CBT and education groups received their interventions. Participants were encouraged to exercise independently for an additional 2-5 days/wk through the remainder of the year. At 6, 9, and 12 months, blinded data collectors measured follow-up exercise behavior and functional outcomes. Using hierarchical linear modeling, results showed that relative to the control group, the CBT and education groups increased their strengthening exercises over time (.05 and .06 higher, respectively); only the CBT group's change was significant. Compared to the control group, the CBT group significantly reduced their walking distance over time (-3.94 yards, p=.011); the education group remained about the same. Finally, relative to the control group, the CBT group significantly reduced their time to walk the up-&-go test (-.05 seconds, p=.021); the education group remained the same. While the CBT group increased their strength training and improved their up-&-go time, they reduced their walking distance. Although CBT may have helped participants learn how cognitions affect behavior, it may have been most effective with novel activities. Practitioners might consider exploring participants' specific thoughts during rote, mundane activities such as walking. Helping participants make alternative plans for boredom may be most effective.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Self-Reported Exercise Behavior and Functional Outcomes in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160832-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Self-Reported Exercise Behavior and Functional Outcomes in Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schneider, Joanne, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-977-8937</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">schneijk@slu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.K. Schneider, School of Nursing, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO; J.H. Cook, Department of Psychology, McKendree University, Lebanon, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite the benefits of exercise, more than 54% of older adults did not maintain recommended exercise levels. The purpose of this study was to compare self-reported exercise behavior and functional outcomes over one year after exercise initiation across three groups of older adults: a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) group, an attention-control health education group, and a control group. Consistent with the self-regulation of exercise maintenance model, the goal of the CBT intervention was to teach participants to recognize and modify their negative thoughts about exercise. After randomization, all three groups received exercise training 3x/wk for two weeks, then 1x/wk for eight weeks during which time the CBT and education groups received their interventions. Participants were encouraged to exercise independently for an additional 2-5 days/wk through the remainder of the year. At 6, 9, and 12 months, blinded data collectors measured follow-up exercise behavior and functional outcomes. Using hierarchical linear modeling, results showed that relative to the control group, the CBT and education groups increased their strengthening exercises over time (.05 and .06 higher, respectively); only the CBT group's change was significant. Compared to the control group, the CBT group significantly reduced their walking distance over time (-3.94 yards, p=.011); the education group remained about the same. Finally, relative to the control group, the CBT group significantly reduced their time to walk the up-&amp;-go test (-.05 seconds, p=.021); the education group remained the same. While the CBT group increased their strength training and improved their up-&amp;-go time, they reduced their walking distance. Although CBT may have helped participants learn how cognitions affect behavior, it may have been most effective with novel activities. Practitioners might consider exploring participants' specific thoughts during rote, mundane activities such as walking. Helping participants make alternative plans for boredom may be most effective.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.