Comparing the Family Resilience Perceived by Adolescents in Three Different Types Divorced Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160836
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparing the Family Resilience Perceived by Adolescents in Three Different Types Divorced Families
Abstract:
Comparing the Family Resilience Perceived by Adolescents in Three Different Types Divorced Families
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Shin, Sung Hee
P.I. Institution Name:UIC
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:9414, Georgetown Sq., Orland Park, IL, 60467, USA
Contact Telephone:7085954071
Co-Authors:S. Shin, H. Choi, M. Kim, College of Nursing , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; Y. Kim, College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF;
Purposes: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare the level of family resilience perceived by adolescents living with three different types of primary caregiver in divorced families: father only, mother only, grandparent(s). Family resilience refers to family hardiness, family communication, problem solving strategies, and social support (McCubbin & McCubbin, 1993). Theoretical framework: The family resilience model (McCubbin & McCubbin, 1993) guided this study. Method: Data were collected from January through March, 2006 at 22 community agencies and elementary schools in three cities in South Korea. A sample of 214 adolescents (10 to 13 years) in divorced families completed self-administered questionnaire: Family Hardiness Index (FHI), Parent-Adolescence Communication Inventory (PACI), Family Crisis Oriental Personal Evaluation Scale (F-COPES), and Social Support Appraisal Scale (SSAS). Descriptive statistics, Chi-Square test, ANOVA, and Tukey test were used for data analysis. Results: The demographic characteristics were not significantly different among the three groups. We found significant differences among the three groups in family hardiness (F=3.323, p=.038), family communication (F=4.606, p=.011), and problem solving strategies (F=7.763, P=.001). Adolescents living with mother reported the highest scores in both family hardiness and family communication. Grandparent(s) group used active problem solving strategies more often than other groups. The level of social support was not statistically different among the three groups. Conclusions: Adolescents' perception of family resilience was significantly different depending on their primary caregivers. To enhance family resilience in divorced families, nurses need to pay closer attention to fathers or grandparent(s) living with adolescent to strengthen their family communication and improve ability to withstand hardships. Focusing on their problem solving abilities would also enhance resilience of divorced families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparing the Family Resilience Perceived by Adolescents in Three Different Types Divorced Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160836-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparing the Family Resilience Perceived by Adolescents in Three Different Types Divorced Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shin, Sung Hee</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UIC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9414, Georgetown Sq., Orland Park, IL, 60467, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">7085954071</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ojackey@lycos.co.kr</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Shin, H. Choi, M. Kim, College of Nursing , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; Y. Kim, College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare the level of family resilience perceived by adolescents living with three different types of primary caregiver in divorced families: father only, mother only, grandparent(s). Family resilience refers to family hardiness, family communication, problem solving strategies, and social support (McCubbin &amp; McCubbin, 1993). Theoretical framework: The family resilience model (McCubbin &amp; McCubbin, 1993) guided this study. Method: Data were collected from January through March, 2006 at 22 community agencies and elementary schools in three cities in South Korea. A sample of 214 adolescents (10 to 13 years) in divorced families completed self-administered questionnaire: Family Hardiness Index (FHI), Parent-Adolescence Communication Inventory (PACI), Family Crisis Oriental Personal Evaluation Scale (F-COPES), and Social Support Appraisal Scale (SSAS). Descriptive statistics, Chi-Square test, ANOVA, and Tukey test were used for data analysis. Results: The demographic characteristics were not significantly different among the three groups. We found significant differences among the three groups in family hardiness (F=3.323, p=.038), family communication (F=4.606, p=.011), and problem solving strategies (F=7.763, P=.001). Adolescents living with mother reported the highest scores in both family hardiness and family communication. Grandparent(s) group used active problem solving strategies more often than other groups. The level of social support was not statistically different among the three groups. Conclusions: Adolescents' perception of family resilience was significantly different depending on their primary caregivers. To enhance family resilience in divorced families, nurses need to pay closer attention to fathers or grandparent(s) living with adolescent to strengthen their family communication and improve ability to withstand hardships. Focusing on their problem solving abilities would also enhance resilience of divorced families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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