2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160838
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bedside Nurses Perception of Simulated Training to Enhance Patient Safety (STEPS)
Abstract:
Bedside Nurses Perception of Simulated Training to Enhance Patient Safety (STEPS)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Sittner, Barbara, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing
Contact Address:1230 'O' Street Suite 131, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA
Contact Telephone:402-472-7376
Co-Authors:B. Sittner, M. Schmaderer, M. Hertzog, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing , Lincoln , NE; B. George, , Saint Elizabeth Regional Medical Center, Lincoln, NE;
Despite a concerted effort to improve patient safety within the acute care setting, patient injuries,unexpected deaths, and unplanned admissions to intensive care units continue to occur. Bedside nurses are instrumental in reducing the number of incidents through early recognition of clinical instability, prompt interventions, and accurate reporting of clinical indicators requiring additional patient care needs. One solution to promote safety within the acute care setting is the use of human patient simulation for experiential learning. The purpose of this study was to examine beside nurses perception of human patient simulation as a teaching strategy to improve patient care outcomes using a Rapid Response Team simulation scenario. The Educational Practices Simulation Scale, Simulation Design Scale and the Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning instruments developed by the National League for Nursing (NLN)/Laerdal Medical project (2005) were used to evaluate bedside nurse's simulation experience. On a scale from one (Strongly Disagree with the statement) to five (Strongly Agree with the tatement), bedside nurses experience with human patient simulation ranged from 4.3 to 4.87. Collaboration and teamwork were ranked highest on the Educational Practices Simulation Scale; fidelity (realism) was rated highest on the Simulation Design Scale; and bedside nurses were satisfied with their experience and confident skills learned from this experience could be translated into practice according to results on the Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning instrument. Human patient simulation offers an innovative training strategy to provide bedside nurses realistic critical healthcare situations where they can apply knowledge and clinical judgment in a controlled learning and ultimately prepare them for real-life situation when they occur.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBedside Nurses Perception of Simulated Training to Enhance Patient Safety (STEPS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160838-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bedside Nurses Perception of Simulated Training to Enhance Patient Safety (STEPS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sittner, Barbara, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1230 'O' Street Suite 131, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-472-7376</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bsittner@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B. Sittner, M. Schmaderer, M. Hertzog, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing , Lincoln , NE; B. George, , Saint Elizabeth Regional Medical Center, Lincoln, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite a concerted effort to improve patient safety within the acute care setting, patient injuries,unexpected deaths, and unplanned admissions to intensive care units continue to occur. Bedside nurses are instrumental in reducing the number of incidents through early recognition of clinical instability, prompt interventions, and accurate reporting of clinical indicators requiring additional patient care needs. One solution to promote safety within the acute care setting is the use of human patient simulation for experiential learning. The purpose of this study was to examine beside nurses perception of human patient simulation as a teaching strategy to improve patient care outcomes using a Rapid Response Team simulation scenario. The Educational Practices Simulation Scale, Simulation Design Scale and the Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning instruments developed by the National League for Nursing (NLN)/Laerdal Medical project (2005) were used to evaluate bedside nurse's simulation experience. On a scale from one (Strongly Disagree with the statement) to five (Strongly Agree with the tatement), bedside nurses experience with human patient simulation ranged from 4.3 to 4.87. Collaboration and teamwork were ranked highest on the Educational Practices Simulation Scale; fidelity (realism) was rated highest on the Simulation Design Scale; and bedside nurses were satisfied with their experience and confident skills learned from this experience could be translated into practice according to results on the Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning instrument. Human patient simulation offers an innovative training strategy to provide bedside nurses realistic critical healthcare situations where they can apply knowledge and clinical judgment in a controlled learning and ultimately prepare them for real-life situation when they occur.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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