Internet Use and Intervention Delivery Preferences Among Advanced Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160839
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Internet Use and Intervention Delivery Preferences Among Advanced Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers
Abstract:
Internet Use and Intervention Delivery Preferences Among Advanced Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Song, Lee-shin, PhD-C
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:400 NIB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734-237-3391
Co-Authors:L. Song, A. Schafenacker, G. Newth, L. Phillips, M. Bialobrzeski, L. Northouse, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI; D. Mood, B. Williams, , Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;
Purpose: Although web-based interventions may be more cost effective and may reach more people, little is known about cancer patients' and family caregivers' (dyads) access to the internet or interest in web-based interventions. The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe the internet use of advanced cancer patients and family caregivers, and 2) identify their delivery preferences for receiving supportive-educative interventions. Theoretical/conceptual framework: Stress-coping framework was used to guide a randomized clinical trial (RCT) testing an intervention to improve patients' and caregivers' quality of life. Methods: Secondary analysis of data obtained from the RCT was used to address the study purposes. The sample consisted of 136 patients and family caregivers who separately completed surveys on Internet Use and Intervention Delivery Preferences. Results: Patients with advanced breast (37%), colorectal (23%), lung (27%) and prostate cancer (14%) completed questionnaires. Most caregivers were spouses (70.8%). The mean age was 60.1 (SD=11.5) for patients and 56.0 (SD=14.35) for caregivers. The majority of patients and caregivers were women (59.5% and 57.7%, respectively). Most dyads were well-educated and with a family income greater than $50,000. Most participants had access to the internet (patients 75% and caregivers 88.4%). The most commonly used internet connections were DSL-enabled phone line, cable modem or wireless at home or at work. Two-thirds of patients and 3/4 of caregivers were comfortable using the internet. Caregivers reported greater access to the internet than patients. Among the intervention delivery methods, the majority of patients and caregivers preferred home visits and clinic programs. Fewer preferred the internet, CD, or telephone programs. Dyads' preference for intervention delivery method did not differ according to age, education, income, gender, and whether they were in the control or intervention group. Conclusions: Patients with advanced cancer and caregivers prefer supportive-educative interventions that are delivered through human contact rather than technology. However, because most participants had access to and were comfortable with the internet, it may be an important intervention resource in the future.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInternet Use and Intervention Delivery Preferences Among Advanced Cancer Patients and Family Caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160839-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Internet Use and Intervention Delivery Preferences Among Advanced Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Song, Lee-shin, PhD-C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">400 NIB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-237-3391</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lsong@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L. Song, A. Schafenacker, G. Newth, L. Phillips, M. Bialobrzeski, L. Northouse, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI; D. Mood, B. Williams, , Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Although web-based interventions may be more cost effective and may reach more people, little is known about cancer patients' and family caregivers' (dyads) access to the internet or interest in web-based interventions. The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe the internet use of advanced cancer patients and family caregivers, and 2) identify their delivery preferences for receiving supportive-educative interventions. Theoretical/conceptual framework: Stress-coping framework was used to guide a randomized clinical trial (RCT) testing an intervention to improve patients' and caregivers' quality of life. Methods: Secondary analysis of data obtained from the RCT was used to address the study purposes. The sample consisted of 136 patients and family caregivers who separately completed surveys on Internet Use and Intervention Delivery Preferences. Results: Patients with advanced breast (37%), colorectal (23%), lung (27%) and prostate cancer (14%) completed questionnaires. Most caregivers were spouses (70.8%). The mean age was 60.1 (SD=11.5) for patients and 56.0 (SD=14.35) for caregivers. The majority of patients and caregivers were women (59.5% and 57.7%, respectively). Most dyads were well-educated and with a family income greater than $50,000. Most participants had access to the internet (patients 75% and caregivers 88.4%). The most commonly used internet connections were DSL-enabled phone line, cable modem or wireless at home or at work. Two-thirds of patients and 3/4 of caregivers were comfortable using the internet. Caregivers reported greater access to the internet than patients. Among the intervention delivery methods, the majority of patients and caregivers preferred home visits and clinic programs. Fewer preferred the internet, CD, or telephone programs. Dyads' preference for intervention delivery method did not differ according to age, education, income, gender, and whether they were in the control or intervention group. Conclusions: Patients with advanced cancer and caregivers prefer supportive-educative interventions that are delivered through human contact rather than technology. However, because most participants had access to and were comfortable with the internet, it may be an important intervention resource in the future.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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