Navigating the Tumultuous Waters of Diabetes from the Landscape of the Schitsu'umsh People

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160842
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Navigating the Tumultuous Waters of Diabetes from the Landscape of the Schitsu'umsh People
Abstract:
Navigating the Tumultuous Waters of Diabetes from the Landscape of the Schitsu'umsh People
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Tiedt, Jane, RN, PhD(c), CDE
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:14212 W Cameron Rd, Cheney, WA, 99004, USA
Contact Telephone:509-235-2373
Co-Authors:J.A. Tiedt, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; J.A. Tiedt, Dept of Nursing, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA;
The landscape of the Schitsu'umsh people is a merging of both traditional native ways of life and the historical impact of westward migration and Euro-American influences. For the Coeur d'Alene tribe, a more recent impact is the devastating affects of diabetes and diabetes related complications. Although diabetes is a significant health problem in the United States, it disproportionally affects Native Americans. Considerable efforts have been established to understand the cultural differences and needs of Native Americans for culturally relevant diabetes education programs. Almost none have focused on tribes in the Columbia Plateau region of the Pacific Northwest. The purpose of this qualitative pilot study is to explore the experiences of Coeur d'Alene tribal members living with type 2 diabetes based on Heideggerian hermeneutics. The target population for this study is Coeur d'Alene tribal members with type 2 diabetes living in eastern Washington and northern Idaho. Up to six participants will be selected to participate in in-depth nonstructured interviews. Attempts to recruit participants through the tribal diabetes educator have been a challenge. Data collection is currently in progress and current recruitment strategies are being modified in order to recruit additional participants. A three step research method is used to analyze and interpret the narrative data from this study. These steps include initial "in-the-moment" hermeneutical interpretations, then analytical interpretations of individual narrative transcripts, and lastly analytical interpretations across all narratives. Preliminary findings highlight the importance of oral traditions to the Schitsu'umsh people and the need for different approaches to diabetes education classes. The results of this pilot study with provide guidance for further diabetes studies with the Coeur d'Alene tribe. Long term goals include using this information to develop culturally relevant assessment tools for diabetes self-management and diabetes education programs for use with other Native American tribes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNavigating the Tumultuous Waters of Diabetes from the Landscape of the Schitsu'umsh Peopleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160842-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Navigating the Tumultuous Waters of Diabetes from the Landscape of the Schitsu'umsh People</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tiedt, Jane, RN, PhD(c), CDE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">14212 W Cameron Rd, Cheney, WA, 99004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">509-235-2373</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jtiedt@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.A. Tiedt, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; J.A. Tiedt, Dept of Nursing, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The landscape of the Schitsu'umsh people is a merging of both traditional native ways of life and the historical impact of westward migration and Euro-American influences. For the Coeur d'Alene tribe, a more recent impact is the devastating affects of diabetes and diabetes related complications. Although diabetes is a significant health problem in the United States, it disproportionally affects Native Americans. Considerable efforts have been established to understand the cultural differences and needs of Native Americans for culturally relevant diabetes education programs. Almost none have focused on tribes in the Columbia Plateau region of the Pacific Northwest. The purpose of this qualitative pilot study is to explore the experiences of Coeur d'Alene tribal members living with type 2 diabetes based on Heideggerian hermeneutics. The target population for this study is Coeur d'Alene tribal members with type 2 diabetes living in eastern Washington and northern Idaho. Up to six participants will be selected to participate in in-depth nonstructured interviews. Attempts to recruit participants through the tribal diabetes educator have been a challenge. Data collection is currently in progress and current recruitment strategies are being modified in order to recruit additional participants. A three step research method is used to analyze and interpret the narrative data from this study. These steps include initial &quot;in-the-moment&quot; hermeneutical interpretations, then analytical interpretations of individual narrative transcripts, and lastly analytical interpretations across all narratives. Preliminary findings highlight the importance of oral traditions to the Schitsu'umsh people and the need for different approaches to diabetes education classes. The results of this pilot study with provide guidance for further diabetes studies with the Coeur d'Alene tribe. Long term goals include using this information to develop culturally relevant assessment tools for diabetes self-management and diabetes education programs for use with other Native American tribes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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