2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160844
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Guided Imagery for Adolescents' Pain After Spinal Surgery
Abstract:
Guided Imagery for Adolescents' Pain After Spinal Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:VanKuiken, Debra, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Cincinnati Children's Hospital
Title:Patient Services
Contact Address:3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45229-3039, USA
Contact Telephone:513-636-9768
Co-Authors:M.M. Huth, D.M. VanKuiken, L. Lin, K. Mason, Center for Professional Excellence - Research & EBP, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH; C. Kleiber, College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Purpose: Pain management guidelines recommend complementing pharmacologic treatment with non-pharmacologic (NP) techniques such as guided imagery (GI). Patients using GI postoperatively experience less pain and anxiety and have shorter hospital stays. Despite evidence in the literature supporting GI use, there is an absence of research evaluating the use of GI for spinal surgery pain in adolescents. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a GI audio compact disk (GICD) in reducing post-spinal fusion surgery pain, increasing relaxation, and stimulating imagery in adolescents. Theoretical Framework: The McCaul-Malott (1984) pain distraction model postulates that high-attention distraction strategies are more powerful in decreasing the perception of pain. Subjects: Twenty adolescents undergoing spinal fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic scoliosis will use a GICD twice daily after surgery. Methods: This pre-post- test pilot study will compare postoperative pain and relaxation scores before and after the use of the GICD. Adolescents listened to the 43-minute professionally developed CD that uses verbal suggestions to enter a magical garden and experience healing and relaxation. Pain and relaxation reported on a 0-100 VAS scale will be analyzed with paired t-tests. Responses to questions about ability to imagine will be categorized using content analysis. Preliminary Results: Fifteen children between 12-19 years (Mean = 15) reported significant differences in pain scores (p = .01) and relaxation scores (p < .0001) after listening to the GICD. Thirteen children reported imagining what was on the tape. Seven were able to imagine other scenarios. The most frequently reported senses used were visual, auditory, and tactile. Conclusions: Adolescents are capable of using guided imagery GICD after extremely painful surgery. Future RCT studies should look at the effectiveness of the GICD as a means of pain management and coping in highly stressful situations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGuided Imagery for Adolescents' Pain After Spinal Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160844-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Guided Imagery for Adolescents' Pain After Spinal Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">VanKuiken, Debra, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cincinnati Children's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Patient Services</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45229-3039, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513-636-9768</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">debra.vankuiken@cchmc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.M. Huth, D.M. VanKuiken, L. Lin, K. Mason, Center for Professional Excellence - Research &amp; EBP, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH; C. Kleiber, College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Pain management guidelines recommend complementing pharmacologic treatment with non-pharmacologic (NP) techniques such as guided imagery (GI). Patients using GI postoperatively experience less pain and anxiety and have shorter hospital stays. Despite evidence in the literature supporting GI use, there is an absence of research evaluating the use of GI for spinal surgery pain in adolescents. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a GI audio compact disk (GICD) in reducing post-spinal fusion surgery pain, increasing relaxation, and stimulating imagery in adolescents. Theoretical Framework: The McCaul-Malott (1984) pain distraction model postulates that high-attention distraction strategies are more powerful in decreasing the perception of pain. Subjects: Twenty adolescents undergoing spinal fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic scoliosis will use a GICD twice daily after surgery. Methods: This pre-post- test pilot study will compare postoperative pain and relaxation scores before and after the use of the GICD. Adolescents listened to the 43-minute professionally developed CD that uses verbal suggestions to enter a magical garden and experience healing and relaxation. Pain and relaxation reported on a 0-100 VAS scale will be analyzed with paired t-tests. Responses to questions about ability to imagine will be categorized using content analysis. Preliminary Results: Fifteen children between 12-19 years (Mean = 15) reported significant differences in pain scores (p = .01) and relaxation scores (p &lt; .0001) after listening to the GICD. Thirteen children reported imagining what was on the tape. Seven were able to imagine other scenarios. The most frequently reported senses used were visual, auditory, and tactile. Conclusions: Adolescents are capable of using guided imagery GICD after extremely painful surgery. Future RCT studies should look at the effectiveness of the GICD as a means of pain management and coping in highly stressful situations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:11:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:11:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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